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All you need to know about Momo Challenge putting millions of teens at risk

The phenomenon may spread throughout the world, from Argentina to the United States, France or Germany.


Devdiscourse News Desk 11 Aug 2018, 07:31 PM
  • But despite the warnings, there is still a lot of confusion. Who is "Momo", where did it come from and why should we pay attention to it? (Image Credit: Twitter)

Is the hype about the horror profile "Momo" on WhatsApp taking a frightening turn? A viral challenge is going around the world through the WhatsApp messaging platform. It is a terrifying game that can be more serious than some imagine and that some compare with the blue whale. 

The phenomenon may spread throughout the world, from Argentina to the United States, France or Germany. The viral appears as a message arrived from an unknown number and with a foreign code (+81 and +57), with a text that threatens something bad if the receiver does not follow the instructions and the number is contacted.

The challenge calls for "Momo", after which the mysterious contact sends violent images or texts with threats (in the language in which the contact wrote). He also asks that the photos be forwarded to the friends of the contactee.

In South America and the US, parents are now being warned of a morbid WhatsApp game - a so-called challenge - in which "Momo" is calling on children and teenagers to commit suicide.

Among the instructions read things like "do not be repetitive in the chat" and "do not let Momo write more than twice without getting an answer". If you do not do it, it is announced that something bad will happen to the contact.

In addition, fictitious versions that Momo is able to respond with personal and close information - thus proving that he mysteriously knows about the contactee, have encouraged the spread of the game.

The National Police of Spain has also warned in this regard, noting that it is better to forget about absurd challenges that are fashionable in WhatsApp.

But despite the warnings, there is still a lot of confusion. Who is "Momo", where did it come from and why should we pay attention to it?

Who is 'Momo'?

The origin of the morbid "Momo" profile photos at WhatsApp is clarified. The image of a distorted young woman with eyes emerging from her caves, lank black hair and bird legs is a work of art by the Japanese company Link Factory. This was exhibited, among others, in the "Vanilla Gallery" in Tokyo.   

In Germany, the police are currently warning against a chain letter, which is sent from a "Momo" profile at WhatsApp. Many users have apparently received this threat (with numerous spelling mistakes):

"Hello my name is Momo and I died 3 years ago I was hit by a car and if you do not want me to stand in your room tonight at 00:00 and watch you sleep then send this message to 15 contacts. You do not believe me?

Angelina 11 harbors the message for fake and does not send it to anyone in the night she hears noises from a corner of her room she wanted to look, but all of a sudden something was running towards her the next morning she was found dead in her bed

Tim 15 sent the message to only 6 people the next morning, he woke up with a eroded leg and a severed arm

Linda 13 sent the message to everyone today who has found her true love and lives with her boyfriend in a modern villa

If you do not send this message, you know what happens, then pass it on and send it on ", as per Merkur.

The story behind "Momo" is dubious, much speaks for a simple fake account. After all, "Momo" could simply have been constructed by someone who wants to create a hype or simply annoy.

The new "blue whale"

Some compare the game of "Momo" with that of the "blue whale", a challenge that went viral in April 2017 and about which the authorities alerted for inciting suicide.

Likewise, that "Momo" spread quickly through the internet and social networks.

The first cases were reported in Russia, but it reached Mexico, Brazil, Colombia and other countries around the world.

In addition, the original account of "Momo" was said to have been online for the last time on July 11, as "Watson". Several days have passed since then, which makes the authenticity of the account doubtful.

Nevertheless, beware of potential criminals who might try to contact you via "Momo" to get your sensitive personal information or to send you ads. 


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