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Health News Summary: Most teens want children but unsure of fertile age

In a survey of more than 1,200 university students, more than 90 percent said they saw kids in their future, but less than half could correctly identify the age when a woman's fertility declines.


Reuters 12 Aug 2018, 12:57 PM
  • Even fewer knew when a man's fertility drops off, the study authors report in the journal Human Fertility. (Image Credit: Pixabay)

Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

India’s Hetero pulls heart drug from U.S. amid cancer risk probes

A unit of India’s Hetero Drugs is recalling some batches of the blood pressure and heart medicine valsartan in the United States, a notice on the U.S. regulator's website said, amid a wider probe into cancer risks associated with the drug. At least a dozen companies around the world have pulled specific batches of valsartan from the market since early July, when regulators said valsartan made by the Chinese supplier Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceuticals had been found to contain a probable human carcinogen, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA).

Monsanto ordered to pay $289 million in world's first Roundup cancer trial

A California jury on Friday found Monsanto liable in a lawsuit filed by a man who alleged the company's glyphosate-based weed-killers, including Roundup, caused his cancer and ordered the company to pay $289 million in damages. The case of school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson was the first lawsuit to go to trial alleging glyphosate causes cancer. Monsanto, a unit of Bayer AG following a $62.5 billion acquisition by the German conglomerate, faces more than 5,000 similar lawsuits across the United States.

Girls with obesity have increased risk of depression

Obese girls are more likely to develop depression during childhood and adolescence than their peers who weigh less, a research review suggests. Compared to girls at a healthy weight, girls with obesity were 44 percent more likely to have depression or to be diagnosed with it in the future, the analysis of 22 studies with a total of almost 144,000 participants found.

Manager support of employees with depression may reduce absenteeism

In a working environment where managers feel comfortable offering help and support rather than avoiding employees with depression, absenteeism is lower and presenteeism is higher, according to a study covering 15 countries. On average, this association between supportive managers and less depression-related absenteeism applied on a national level too, the researchers found. Employees who live in a country with a larger number of managers who avoid talking about depression tend to take more days off work, the study team reports in BMJ Open.

Four new Congo Ebola cases as medics prepare experimental treatment

Four new cases of Ebola virus have been confirmed in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, the health ministry said, as authorities prepare to deploy an experimental treatment. The latest confirmed cases near the town of Mangina in Congo's North Kivu province bring the total for the current outbreak to 21, the ministry said in a statement late on Friday.

Alnylam's gene silencing drug wins FDA approval

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals Inc's drug for a rare hereditary disease won U.S. regulatory approval on Friday, becoming the first approved treatment from a new class of medicines that use gene silencing technology. Alnylam's patisiran, commercially named Onpattro, was approved to treat polyneuropathy in patients with hereditary ATTR amyloidosis, a potentially fatal condition that affects an estimated 50,000 people worldwide.

College-age students unsure when fertility declines

Most university students may plan to have children in the future, but they also probably overestimate how much time they have before their fertility starts to wane, an Australian study suggests. In a survey of more than 1,200 university students, more than 90 percent said they saw kids in their future, but less than half could correctly identify the age when a woman's fertility declines and even fewer knew when a man's fertility drops off, the study authors report in the journal Human Fertility.

Amicus Therapeutics receives U.S. approval for Fabry disease drug

U.S. health regulators on Friday approved Amicus Therapeutics' Galafold, the first oral therapy to treat Fabry disease, a rare, sometimes fatal condition in which accumulation of fat damages several organs. Galafold, known chemically as migalastat, will be the first new Fabry treatment on the U.S. market in over 15 years and will compete with Sanofi SA’s infused Fabrazyme.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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