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Australia to build laser waste detector technology

EOS Space Systems institution has built and developed a tracking system for satellite and space trash at Mount Stromlo in Canberra.


Devdiscourse News Desk
Updated: 23-03-2018 09:46 IST
Australia to build laser waste detector technology

With the laser tracking system, the object can be tracked objects and predicted collisions with high accuracy. (Image credit: NASA)

Waste space is a real problem that could cause disaster for humans on Earth. Now Australian scientists are creating sophisticated lasers based on the mainland, to shoot the garbage.

According to Australia Plus, EOS Space Systems institution has built and developed a tracking system for satellite and space trash at Mount Stromlo in Canberra.

Spaces junk is a variety of satellite launchers that have expired and continue to float in outer space.

The company's chairman, Professor Craig Smith, said that researchers have developed photon-pressure lasers that can move the debris of outer space, and change their orbits. The first step for scientists is to use low-powered lasers to detect and follow objects identified in space, as per Australia Plus.

"With the laser tracking system, we track objects and predict collisions with high accuracy," says Professor Smith. If a piece of space truck looks like it's about to collide with another piece, then the laser will be used to change its orbit.

The next step is to increase the power to a larger and larger laser. "Then we can begin to move it into satellite orbit by reducing its speed so that it can change the height of the orbit," said Professor Smith, as per Australia Plus.

However, Professor Smith said that scientists must make sure they do not split the debris in two, which will then increase the amount of space junk in orbit. "The real problem is that you make it harder.If they become smaller they become more difficult and more difficult to trace, and therefore they start becoming invisible - but also still lethal for satellites."

COUNTRY : Australia