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Reuters Health News Summary


Reuters
Updated: 29-12-2018 18:26 IST

Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

FDA chief to meet e-cigarette makers amid crackdown

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plans to meet top-level executives of e-cigarette makers, the agency's chief said on Thursday, hinting that some companies seem to be backing away from commitments related to youth's access to e-cigarettes. "There's no reason manufacturers must wait for FDA to forcefully address the epidemic. Yet some already appear to back away from commitments made to the FDA and the public," FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said https://twitter.com/SGottliebFDA/status/1078304963078574080 on Twitter.

Migrants to affluent nations may be healthier than the native-born

(Reuters Health) - International migrants who relocate to high-income countries to work, study or join family members are less likely to die prematurely than people born in their new homelands, a research review suggests. For the analysis, researchers examined data from 96 studies with mortality estimates for more than 15.2 million international migrants in 92 countries. Overall, migrants were about 30 percent less likely to experience premature death from all causes than other people in the general populations of the countries where they moved, the analysis found.

More U.S. adults losing sleep in recent years

(Reuters Health) - One third of U.S. adults say they sleep less than six hours a night, which is 15 percent more than were getting too little sleep 15 years ago, researchers say. The trend toward increasing numbers of people getting too little shuteye started in 2013, the study team reports in the journal Sleep. Most of this recent shift from adequate to inadequate sleep duration was among Hispanic and non-Hispanic black adults, widening racial and ethnic disparities in sleep, and potentially disparities in health.

To lower blood pressure, exercise may be as good as medication

For people with high blood pressure, starting an exercise regimen may lower blood pressure by as much as taking medication would, a large analysis suggests. Researchers combined data from nearly 400 randomized trials that assessed the effects of blood pressure drugs or of exercise on blood pressure. They found that overall, each lowered blood pressure by nearly 9 mmHg (millimeters of mercury) in patients with hypertension.

WHO says progress against Ebola in Congo will be lost if violence goes on

Progress in fighting Democratic Republic of Congo's Ebola outbreak, the second worst ever, will be reversed if fighting continues around the disease hotspots of Beni and Butembo, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. "We have reached a critical point in the Ebola response," WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. "After an intensification of field activities, we were seeing hopeful signs in many areas, including a recent decrease in cases in Beni.

Drug use during pregnancy not child abuse: Pennsylvania top court

A divided Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled on Friday that mothers who use illegal drugs during their pregnancies are not committing child abuse against their newly-born children. Reversing a lower court ruling, the 5-2 decision came amid a nationwide opioid crisis, including abuse by pregnant women that can result in preterm labor, stillbirth and withdrawal symptoms for new babies.

Leafy green neighborhoods tied to better heart health

People who live in neighborhoods with more green spaces may have less stress, healthier blood vessels and a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes than residents of communities without many outdoor recreation areas, a small study suggests. At the population level, residential green space has long been linked to a lower risk of death from heart disease and respiratory problems, as well as a lower risk of hospitalization for events like heart attacks and strokes, researchers note in the Journal of the American Heart Association. But there isn't as much evidence showing whether this connection holds true for individuals.

Scheduled dialysis for undocumented immigrants saves money and lives

Providing scheduled dialysis for undocumented immigrants with kidney failure, rather than offering them only emergency dialysis, dramatically reduces deaths, healthcare use and costs, a study in Texas suggests. The difference was so significant that the study authors recommend scheduled, three-times-a-week dialysis as the universal standard of care for all patients in the U.S. with end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

Doctors still prescribing testosterone to men with heart disease, despite risks

(Reuters Health) - Despite warnings that supplemental testosterone may raise the risk of stroke and heart attack, doctors continue to prescribe the hormone off-label to men with cardiovascular disease, a U.S. study finds. After poring over 10 years of prescription data, researchers found that men with heart disease were no less likely than those without it to receive a testosterone prescription despite warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2014 that the hormone might increase cardiovascular risk, researchers reported in JAMA Internal Medicine.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)