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Reuters Health News Summary


Reuters
Updated: 05-01-2019 02:27 IST

Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers must face $1 billion syphilis infections lawsuit

A federal judge in Maryland said The Johns Hopkins University, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and the Rockefeller Foundation must face a $1 billion lawsuit over their roles in a 1940s U.S. government experiment that infected hundreds of Guatemalans with syphilis. In a decision on Thursday, U.S. District Judge Theodore Chuang rejected the defendants' argument that a recent Supreme Court decision shielding foreign corporations from being sued in U.S. courts over human rights abuses abroad also applied to domestic corporations absent Congressional authorization.

Little evidence that non-sugar sweeteners lead to improved health

A review of research on artificial and natural sweeteners commonly used as alternatives to sugar failed to find strong evidence they provide significant health benefits, but also found no harm from using them. The analysis, published in The BMJ, was commissioned by the World Health Organization with the aim of developing guidelines on the use of non-sugar sweeteners such as aspartame and stevia.

Ambulance equipment contaminated with drug-resistant superbug

Ambulance oxygen tanks are likely to carry the "superbug" MRSA, a small U.S. study suggests, pointing to the need for regular disinfection of medical equipment. Researchers tested nine oxygen tanks carried by three ambulances based at an emergency medical services (EMS) station in Alabama. They found MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, on all nine tanks.

Stroke survivors in U.S. may be getting less healthy

Stroke survivors are doing better at managing their blood pressure and cholesterol today than a generation ago, but a growing number now have poor eating and exercise habits that carry a risk of repeat strokes, a small U.S. study suggests. To minimize the risk of another stroke, the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends seven key things: not smoking, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, keeping blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar in check, and eating a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and lean protein with limited sweets and fats.

High rate of food allergies seen in U.S. adults

More than 10 percent of American adults are allergic to at least one food, a new study suggests. Among more than 40,000 adults surveyed, 10.8 percent reported the kinds of severe symptoms that are consistent with a food allergy, and another 8.2 percent said they believed they had food allergies, but their symptoms suggested other causes, according to the report in JAMA Network Open.

Tests show suspected Swedish Ebola patient not infected

Medical tests have shown a patient treated in isolation at Sweden's Uppsala University Hospital for suspected Ebola is not infected with the virus after all, authorities said on Friday. The patient, whose identity was not disclosed, was isolated and transferred to the hospital north of Stockholm after originally being admitted to the emergency ward of the smaller Enkoping hospital.

China warns pig trade against African swine fever cover-ups as Taiwan concerns grow

China has warned the country's pork industry that covering up cases of African swine fever is a crime, days after a dead pig was found on a Taiwanese beach prompting Taipei to claim Beijing was not sharing accurate information on the disease. China's animal husbandry and veterinary affairs bureau is stepping up investigation and punishment of illegal activity in the pig industry, said a statement published on the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs website on Friday.

Woman first to claim infection after surgery at New Jersey facility

A former patient at a New Jersey surgical facility that state health officials said may have exposed thousands of patients to HIV and other blood-borne pathogens has tested positive for hepatitis B, one of her lawyers said on Thursday. The unidentified 58-year-old Brooklyn woman, a plaintiff in a lawsuit filed on Monday, is the first of 3,778 former patients at HealthPlus Surgery Center in Saddle Brook, New Jersey, known to claim she or he became infected because of faulty sterilization and medication practices at the facility.

Social media linked to higher risk of depression in teen girls

Teenage girls are twice as likely as boys to show depressive symptoms linked to social media use - mainly due to online harassment and disturbed sleep, as well as poor body image and lower self-esteem, researchers said on Friday. In a study analyzing data from nearly 11,000 young people in Britain, researchers found that 14-year-old girls were heavier users of social media, with two-fifths of them using it for more than three hours a day, compared with a fifth of boys.

U.S. judge limits evidence in trial over Roundup cancer claims

A federal judge overseeing lawsuits alleging Bayer AG's glyphosate-based weed killer causes cancer has issued a ruling that could severely restrict evidence that the plaintiffs consider crucial to their cases. U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria in San Francisco in an order on Thursday granted Bayer unit Monsanto's request to split an upcoming trial into two phases. The order initially bars lawyers for plaintiff Edwin Hardeman from introducing evidence that the company allegedly attempted to influence regulators and manipulate public opinion.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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