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Here's how secret to remain healthy decoded by researchers

Devdiscourse News Desk | Washington DC | Updated: 15-05-2019 13:38 IST | Created: 15-05-2019 11:48 IST
Here's how secret to remain healthy decoded by researchers
According to Kang, health decisions, even those as simple and mundane as choosing between the elevator and the stairs, involve some amount of decisional conflict. Image Credit: ANI

Everybody wants to stay fit. However, while for some, meeting their fitness goals seem like a cakewalk as they love eating healthy food, many constantly struggle. Ever wonder why? According to a new study people with stronger life purpose are more likely to accept messages promoting health behaviour change than those with a weaker sense of purpose. The findings suggest that this might be because they experience less decisional conflict while considering health advice.

"Purpose in life has been robustly associated with health in previous studies. But the mechanism through which life purpose may promote healthy living has been unclear," said Yoona Kang, lead author of the study published in the Journal of Health Psychology. For this study, published in Health Psychology, Kang and her co-authors chose to test out a theory: that making health decisions might take less effort for those with a higher sense of purpose in life.

According to Kang, health decisions, even those as simple and mundane as choosing between the elevator and the stairs, involve some amount of decisional conflict. But what if some people experience less conflict than others when considering these options, perhaps because they have a stronger guiding purpose that helps resolve the conflicts?

To test this idea, the researchers recruited sedentary people who needed to exercise more. Participants completed a survey about their life purpose by indicating the degree to which they agreed or disagreed with statements like "I have a sense of direction and purpose in my life" or "I don't have a good sense of what it is I'm trying to accomplish in life." Next, they were shown health messages promoting physical activity. Their responses to the messages were monitored by an fMRI scanner, focusing on brain regions that tend to be active when people aren't sure what to choose or when they feel conflicted.

Those participants who reported a stronger sense of life purpose were more likely to agree with the health messages and to have less activity in brain regions associated with conflict-processing. In fact, the researchers were able to predict how likely it was that a person would agree with health messages based on the degree of brain activity in these regions.

"We conduct studies both to understand how different kinds of health messaging can help transform people's behaviours and why some people might be more susceptible than others. This study does a nice job starting to unpack reasons why people who have a higher sense of purpose in life might be more able to take advantage of this messaging when they encounter it," said Emily Falk, director of the Communication Neuroscience Lab.


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