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UK government launches campaign to boost donation rates within BAME communities

According to a new report released earlier this week, only 7 per cent of donors last year were from BAME backgrounds, with Indians accounting for just 1.9 per cent of the state-funded National Health Service's (NHS) Organ Donation Register (ODR).


PTI United Kingdom
Updated: 20-07-2018 18:42 IST
UK government launches campaign to boost donation rates within BAME communities

The latest drive to encourage more people from Asian communities to sign up to the ODR will be delivered by NHS Blood and Transplant, with support from the National BAME Transplant Alliance (NBTA). (Image Credit: Twitter)

The UK government has launched a new campaign aimed at increasing organ donation rates within black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities that include Indians by raising awareness and breaking down barriers to donation.

According to a new report released earlier this week, only 7 per cent of donors last year were from BAME backgrounds, with Indians accounting for just 1.9 per cent of the state-funded National Health Service's (NHS) Organ Donation Register (ODR).

The report found that 21 per cent of people who died on the organ donation waiting list in the UK last year were from a BAME background, compared with 15 per cent a decade ago. Family refusal continues to be the biggest obstacle to organ donation among the UK's Asian communities, it noted.

"The government, MPs, faith leaders, charities, campaigners, influencers, friends and families all have a role to play to address myths and barriers and bring attention to the lifesaving power of donation," said UK health minister Jackie Doyle-Price.

The latest drive to encourage more people from Asian communities to sign up to the ODR will be delivered by NHS Blood and Transplant, with support from the National BAME Transplant Alliance (NBTA).

Anthony Clarkson from NHS Blood and Transplant said: "While it is encouraging that more black, Asian and ethnic minority families are supporting donation – making more lifesaving transplants possible – change is not happening fast enough and too many lives are being lost.

"Although many black, Asian and ethnic minority patients are able to receive a transplant from a white donor, others may die if there is no donor from their own community."

The report highlights data and case studies from four other countries, including India, the US, Israel, and Qatar – to show that attempts to counter cultural and religious barriers to organ donation are having some impact. Faith-based public education campaigns and donor recognition initiatives have played a vital role in improving organ donation rates in India, it found.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

COUNTRY : United Kingdom

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