U.S. could cover travel, healthcare for migrant families separated under Trump

The administration of U.S. President Joe Biden outlined guidance for its family reunification task force as it seeks to reunite migrant children and parents separated by Trump's border policy.

Reuters | Updated: 02-03-2021 06:39 IST | Created: 02-03-2021 06:39 IST
U.S. could cover travel, healthcare for migrant families separated under Trump

The United States could help pay for transportation, healthcare, legal services, and career and educational programs for migrant families separated under former President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" border strategy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said on Monday. The administration of U.S. President Joe Biden outlined guidance for its family reunification task force as it seeks to reunite migrant children and parents separated by Trump's border policy. The costs could also be covered by non-profit organizations and the private sector, but not the migrant families, DHS said in a press statement.

Thousands of children were separated from their parents at the border under Trump's "zero tolerance" policy, which charged parents with federal immigration offenses and sent them to jails while children were labeled "unaccompanied" and placed in shelters. But advocates say border officials separated families both before and after that policy was in place. Some families have already been reunited as part of litigation challenging the separations, while other families remain apart, including some whose parents were deported. Efforts are still ongoing in court to locate the parents of more than 500 separated children.

The Biden administration has said it will consider bringing deported parents back to the United States, an option outlined in a Feb. 2 executive order, which created the family reunification task force. Michelle Brane, who most recently worked as a senior director with the New York City-based Women’s Refugee Commission, will be the executive director of task force.

The numbers of children and families arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border have risen in recent months and Biden, who took office on Jan. 20, has faced criticism from Trump and other Republicans for rolling back hardline border policies. INCREASED BORDER PATROL

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said Monday it was deploying additional Border Patrol agents to the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas "due to fluctuations along the southwest border." U.S. officials have been releasing migrant families from CBP custody to shelters in the region since late January after Mexican authorities in the state of Tamaulipas stopped accepting some migrants the U.S. expelled under a public health order.

A CBP official who requested anonymity to discuss internal operations told Reuters that several hundred agents would deploy from coastal regions and northern borders. CBP declined to answer questions about how many agents it planned to send and when it would deploy them. Biden moved to quickly rescind several of Trump's restrictive immigration policies, including parts of the U.S. public health order that allowed officials to rapidly expel unaccompanied minors caught at the U.S.-Mexico border. Last week, the administration said it opened a temporary shelter for minors in Texas that was used during the Trump presidency and is taking steps to speed up releases of the children to sponsors.

At a press briefing at the White House on Monday, DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas argued the United States is not experiencing a crisis at the border, instead calling the situation "a challenge ... that we are managing." The Biden administration is considering placing personnel from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Border Patrol stations to speed up the process of finding out whether unaccompanied children have relatives in the United States, Mayorkas said.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Tracking Fintech during COVID-19: Harnessing power of technology

Its abundantly clear now that as fintech cements its place in the financial sector, accelerated further by the COVID-19 pandemic, it could open the sector to new possibilities by harnessing the power of technology to deliver financial ...

Tectonic turns: How technology shaped healthcare over the decades

Tracing an episodic evolution, with technology at the interface of human and his health....

World Water Day sees crises of inequality in countries both rich and poor

... ...

Privacy and data protection: Reviewing notable policy frameworks

The evolved privacy principles and the resulting legislation across the world primarily aim to force the data collector to define the purpose for which the data is being collected along with the need to obtain explicit consent for the said ...

Videos

Latest News

3 children found fatally stabbed in Los Angeles apartment

A woman discovered her three grandchildren, all under the age of five, slain inside a Los Angeles apartment Saturday morning and their mother gone, police said. The mother, considered a suspect, was being sought by authorities.The grandmoth...

Trump in 2024? He says only that 'a Republican' will win

Former US President Donald Trump plans to affirm his commitment to the Republican Party and raise the possibility that someone else will be the GOPs next presidential nominee in a closed-door speech to donors on Saturday night.Trumps mess...

Jazz drama "Ma Rainey" wins two prizes at BAFTAs opening night

Ma Raineys Black Bottom, a jazz drama set in 1920s Chicago, won two awards at the opening of the BAFTAs on Saturday, but the race for the main prizes remains open with a list of contenders that shines a spotlight on diversity. The British A...

S.Korean battery makers agree last-minute deal in boost to Biden's EV policy

South Korean battery makers LG Chem and rival SK Innovation Co have agreed to settle a trade secrets dispute that has threatened a key Georgia plant and the electric vehicle plans of Ford Motor Co and Volkswagen AG, three sources briefed on...

Give Feedback