Reuters US Domestic News Summary

At 2.15 p.m. ET (1815 GMT) Uber shares traded down 3.2%, Lyft was down 5.8% and DoorDash fell 5%. Atlanta forced to reinstate policeman charged with killing Black man The city of Atlanta on Wednesday reinstated a police officer fired over the fatal shooting of a Black man last year after an oversight board ruled that he was terminated without due process.


Reuters | Updated: 06-05-2021 05:25 IST | Created: 06-05-2021 05:25 IST
Reuters US Domestic News Summary

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

Biden administration blocks Trump-era rule affecting gig workers

The Biden administration on Wednesday blocked a Trump-era rule that would have made it easier to classify gig workers who work for companies like Uber and Lyft as independent contractors instead of employees, signaling a potential policy shift toward greater worker protections. Shares of companies that employ gig labor such as Uber, Lyft and DoorDash immediately pared gains. At 2.15 p.m. ET (1815 GMT) Uber shares traded down 3.2%, Lyft was down 5.8% and DoorDash fell 5%.

Atlanta forced to reinstate policeman charged with killing Black man

The city of Atlanta on Wednesday reinstated a police officer fired over the fatal shooting of a Black man last year after an oversight board ruled that he was terminated without due process. The Atlanta Civil Service Board said the city failed to follow its own procedures when Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms dismissed Garrett Rolfe, who is white, without a hearing. He shot Rayshard Brooks, 27, in the back in June outside a Wendy's restaurant.

U.S. court authorizes IRS to seek identities of taxpayers who have used cryptocurrency

A federal court in the United States has authorized the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to serve a "John Doe Summons" on the crypto exchange Kraken, seeking identities of U.S. taxpayers who have used cryptocurrency, the Department of Justice said on Wednesday. The IRS is seeking information about taxpayers who conducted at least $20,000 worth of transactions in cryptocurrency from 2016 to 2020, the DOJ said in a statement.

U.S. reverses stance, backs giving poorer countries access to COVID-19 vaccine patents, tech

President Joe Biden on Wednesday threw his support behind waiving intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines, bowing to mounting pressure from Democratic lawmakers and more than 100 other countries, but angering pharmaceutical companies. Biden voiced his support for a temporary waiver - a sharp reversal of the previous U.S. position - after a speech at the White House, followed swiftly by an official statement from his chief trade negotiator, Katherine Tai.

Free booze, baseball tickets offered as U.S. demand for COVID-19 vaccine drops

Robert Day walked up to a house in northwest Detroit, eager to talk about nearby COVID-19 vaccination sites and pitch a local program that pays $50 to anyone who brings someone to a clinic to get inoculated. A man sitting on the porch, who refused to give his name, tore up the flyer Day had handed him and stormed inside.

Facebook has six months to determine if Trump returns

Facebook Inc's oversight board on Wednesday upheld the company's suspension of former U.S. President Donald Trump but said the company was wrong to make the suspension indefinite and gave it six months to determine a "proportionate response." Trump called the decision and his banning across tech platforms "a total disgrace" and said the companies would "pay a political price."

Factbox: Five takeaways from Facebook oversight board's Trump case

Facebook's oversight board, a body set up by the social network to give independent verdicts on a small number of thorny content decisions, has ruled Facebook was right to bar former U.S. President Donald Trump after the Jan 6. riot but wrong in placing an indefinite suspension. Here are five takeaways from the board's case decision:

In Trump's crosshairs, Cheney says Republicans 'at a turning point'

U.S. Representative Liz Cheney warned on Wednesday that her Republican Party is "at a turning point" as it prepares to try to remove her from leadership for rejecting former President Donald Trump's false claims the election was stolen from him. The No. 3 House Republican's warning came in an opinion column published in the Washington Post as top members of her party, including Trump and No. 2 House Republican Steve Scalise, publicly endorsed Representative Elise Stefanik for Cheney's job as chair of the party's conference. A vote could come as early as next Wednesday.

Police officer injured in U.S. Capitol riot urges Congress not to 'downplay' attack

A police officer who was injured when hundreds of supporters of former President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol pleaded with U.S. lawmakers not to "downplay" the day's violence that killed five, including a fellow officer. "I struggle daily with the emotional anxiety of having survived such a traumatic event but I also struggle with the anxiety of hearing those who continue to downplay the events of that day," Washington Metropolitan police officer Mike Fanone said in an open letter on Wednesday.

Judge voids U.S. moratorium on evicting renters during pandemic

A federal judge on Wednesday threw out the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's nationwide moratorium on evictions, a setback for the millions of Americans who have fallen behind on rent payments during the coronavirus pandemic. U.S. District Judge Dabney Friedrich said that while there was "no doubt" Congress intended to empower the CDC to combat COVID-19 through a range of measures such as quarantines, a moratorium on residential evictions was not among them.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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