US Domestic News Roundup: Biden to promote $4 trillion plans in visit to Virginia school; Biden to start reunifying separated migrant families and more

The Asian American Foundation will invest its initial funding - described by organizers as the largest-ever philanthropic effort to support the AAPI community - in three key areas: anti-hate programs, education, and data and research. U.S. screens 1.63 million people at airports, highest since March 2020 The U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) said it screened 1.63 million passengers on Sunday at U.S. airports, the highest number since March 2020, when the coronavirus pandemic slashed travel demand.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 03-05-2021 18:41 IST | Created: 03-05-2021 18:31 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: Biden to promote $4 trillion plans in visit to Virginia school; Biden to start reunifying separated migrant families and more

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

Biden to promote $4 trillion plans in visit to Virginia school

President Joe Biden travels to coastal Virginia on Monday to promote how his proposals to spend $4 trillion for infrastructure and families will help the U.S. education system.

Biden, joined by his wife, Jill Biden, a teacher, will visit an elementary school in Yorktown and deliver remarks at Tidewater Community College in Norfolk, Virginia.

Biden to start reunifying migrant families separated by Trump-era border policy

The United States this week will reunite four migrant families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border during the Trump administration, U.S. officials said, a small step toward fulfilling a campaign promise by President Joe Biden. The families will be allowed to enter the United States through an emergency process known as "humanitarian parole," Michelle Brane, who heads a Biden-created task force that aims to reunite separated families, told a call with reporters on Sunday.

Analysis: Biden, Powell paddling in same direction on policy front

Within a span of six hours last week, U.S. President Joe Biden and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell embarked on a potentially historic course, pairing massive government spending and ultra-easy monetary policy in an effort not just to rescue the economy from a recession but to reset its trajectory. Powell's motivation is to push the limits of a job market rebound as far as possible, a goal that is a step beyond what the U.S. central bank has done before and which he restated Wednesday in an emphatic pledge to get Americans back to work.

Tornado rips through Mississippi, damages buildings, power lines

A tornado tore through the southern U.S. city of Tupelo on Sunday, blowing the roofs off homes and tearing down trees and power lines, but there were no immediate reports of injuries. "Emergency crews are currently assessing the degree of damage," the mayor's office said in a statement on Facebook, urging people to stay in their homes.

Drug distributors face off against West Virginia in billion-dollar opioid trial

The three largest U.S. drug distributors, who are accused of helping fuel the opioid crisis that has resulted in nearly 500,000 overdose deaths in the United States, will defend themselves in a trial that kicks off on Monday. The trial against AmerisourceBergen Corp, McKesson Corp and Cardinal Health Inc in Charleston, West Virginia, involves a lawsuit seeking more than $1 billion brought by the city of Huntington and Cabell County.

U.S. administers 245.6 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines: CDC

The United States has administered 245,591,469 doses of COVID-19 vaccines in the country as of Sunday morning, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Sunday.

A total of 243,463,471 vaccine doses had been administered by May 1, the CDC said.

U.S. Treasury's Yellen tamps down inflation fears over Biden spending plan

U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Sunday tamped down concerns that President Joe Biden's plans for infrastructure, jobs and families will cause inflation, saying the spending will be phased in over a decade. "It's spread out quite evenly over eight to 10 years," Yellen, former Federal Reserve chair, said in an interview with NBC's "Meet the Press."

Four dead when suspected migrant-smuggling boat breaks apart off San Diego

Four people were killed and more than two dozen injured on Sunday when a boat suspected of attempting to smuggle migrants into California broke apart off Cabrillo National Monument at San Diego's rugged Point Loma, the U.S. Coast Guard said. The initial call arrived just before 10 a.m. (1700 GMT) and prompted a large emergency response, including the U.S. Coast Guard and state and local agencies, as the magnitude of the incident became clear.

Asian American business leaders launch $250M effort to combat anti-Asian hate

Business leaders launched a five-year, $250 million drive on Monday to support the causes of Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders, vowing to set up a national infrastructure for a community targeted by a rising number of racial attacks. The Asian American Foundation will invest its initial funding - described by organizers as the largest-ever philanthropic effort to support the AAPI community - in three key areas: anti-hate programs, education, and data and research.

U.S. screens 1.63 million people at airports, highest since March 2020

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) said it screened 1.63 million passengers on Sunday at U.S. airports, the highest number since March 2020, when the coronavirus pandemic slashed travel demand. The number of U.S. air travelers is still about 35% lower than the same date in 2019, down about 1 million travelers, TSA said. By comparison, just 170,000 people were screened at U.S. airports on the same day in May 2020. U.S. airlines have been adding more flights, anticipating rising summer travel demand.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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