US Domestic News Roundup: United Steelworkers accuse Exxon of union-busting at Texas refinery; U.S. appeals court reinstates Texas abortion law, two days after it was halted and more

Houston-based Amplify Energy Corp and several state and federal regulatory agencies have provided differing accounts of what happened on Oct. 2, when the pipeline spill that fouled beaches, killed wildlife and closed down fishing along miles of coastline was officially reported. Pelosi meets pope as abortion debate rages back home Pope Francis met on Saturday with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Catholic who has come under criticism from some bishops in the United States for her support for abortion rights.


Reuters | Updated: 10-10-2021 18:34 IST | Created: 10-10-2021 18:28 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: United Steelworkers accuse Exxon of union-busting at Texas refinery; U.S. appeals court reinstates Texas abortion law, two days after it was halted and more
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Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

United Steelworkers accuse Exxon of union-busting at Texas refinery

The labor union representing workers locked out of an Exxon Mobil Corp refinery on Friday accused the oil company of trying to "bust our union" by supporting efforts to officially remove the union with a decertification vote. Any vote would be tainted by "serious unfair labor practices," the USW said in a statement that accused Exxon of "misleading people with confusing statements regarding our union, our negotiations and the company's spiteful lockout."

U.S. appeals court reinstates Texas abortion law, two days after it was halted

A U.S. appeals court late on Friday temporarily reinstated Texas's restrictive abortion law, which bars the procedure as early as six weeks into pregnancy and outsources enforcement of the ban to ordinary citizens. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, a conservative-leaning intermediate appeals court, granted a request on Friday by the Texas Attorney General's Office to temporarily suspend a judge's order blocking the abortion ban.

Despite preparation, California pipeline operator may have taken hours to stop leak

The company that operates the pipeline that spilled an estimated 3,000 barrels of oil into the Pacific Ocean off California has an 800-page manual on handling an oil spill - but it is unclear whether its employees followed those procedures. Houston-based Amplify Energy Corp and several state and federal regulatory agencies have provided differing accounts of what happened on Oct. 2, when the pipeline spill that fouled beaches, killed wildlife and closed down fishing along miles of coastline was officially reported.

Pelosi meets pope as abortion debate rages back home

Pope Francis met on Saturday with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Catholic who has come under criticism from some bishops in the United States for her support for abortion rights. Their meeting took place several weeks before Joe Biden is expected to meet the pope while the U.S. president is in Rome for talks between leaders of the Group of 20 major economies.

Boston Marathon bombing victims split on death penalty in U.S. Supreme Court case

Liz Norden and Mikey Borgard both suffered when two bombs exploded at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon, sending shrapnel through a crowd of hundreds of people. Norden's two adult sons lost their right legs. Borgard sustained hearing loss and a brain injury. Yet they and others affected by the attack that killed three people and wounded 264 more disagree about whether convicted bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev should be executed - a question the U.S. Supreme Court will consider on Wednesday when the justices hear the U.S. government's bid to reinstate his death sentence.

Trump endorses re-election of Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley

Former U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday endorsed the re-election campaign of Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley, who is seeking an 8th term through the 2022 U.S. midterm election. Trump was speaking at a rally in Iowa.

U.S. will not pursue charges against police officer over Jacob Blake shooting

The U.S. Justice Department said on Friday it will not pursue federal criminal civil rights charges against a Kenosha, Wisconsin, police officer for his involvement in the August 2020 shooting of Jacob Blake. Blake, who is Black, was shot by police several times in the back in front of his young children and was left paralyzed from the waist down. The incident sparked days of deadly protests against police brutality and racism in his hometown and across the United States.

McConnell says Republicans will not again aid Democrats in raising debt limit

One day after the Senate approved a temporary lift to the U.S. debt ceiling, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell wrote in a letter to President Joe Biden that he would not aid Democrats again in raising the debt limit. Following weeks of partisan fighting, the Senate approved the short-term fix that will allow the United States to avoid defaulting on its bills in a 50-48 vote on Thursday evening. The House will vote on the measure on Tuesday.

Two wealthy dads convicted in first U.S. college admissions scandal trial

Two wealthy fathers who were the first to face trial in the U.S. college admissions scandal were convicted on Friday of charges that they corruptly tried to buy their children's way into elite universities as phony athletic recruits. A federal jury in Boston found former casino executive Gamal Aziz and private equity firm founder John Wilson guilty on all charges they faced in a case centered on a vast, nationwide fraud and bribery scheme that involved many other parents.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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