US Domestic News Roundup: Musk says he would reverse Twitter ban on Donald Trump; Explainer-Some patients reporting COVID rebounds after taking Pfizer pills and more

The White House and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) previously asked USPS to reconsider. U.S. Senate Democrats put abortion-rights bill to the test Wednesday Democrats in the U.S. Senate plan to force a vote on Wednesday on legislation codifying women's rights to abortion nationwide, a protest gesture that is almost certain to fail ahead of an expected Supreme Court decision to end those protections.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 11-05-2022 18:35 IST | Created: 11-05-2022 18:31 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: Musk says he would reverse Twitter ban on Donald Trump; Explainer-Some patients reporting COVID rebounds after taking Pfizer pills and more
American billionaire Elon Musk (File Image) Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

Musk says he would reverse Twitter ban on Donald Trump

Billionaire Elon Musk said on Tuesday he would reverse Twitter's ban on former U.S. President Donald Trump when he buys the social media platform, the clearest signal yet of Musk's intention to cut moderation of the site. Musk, the world's richest person and chief executive of electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc, has inked a $44 billion deal to buy Twitter Inc. He has called himself a "free speech absolutist," but given few specific details of his plans.

Explainer-Some patients reporting COVID rebounds after taking Pfizer pills

More than 2.8 million courses of Pfizer Inc's COVID-19 oral antiviral treatment Paxlovid have been made available at pharmacies around the United States, with the Biden administration working to improve access to the drug. As Paxlovid has become more widely used, some patients have reported that COVID-19 symptoms recurred after completing treatment and experiencing improvement. Here is the latest information on these rebounds:

Biden to highlight Russia-driven food prices spike at farm visit

U.S. President Joe Biden will seek to highlight how Russia's war on Ukraine has impacted global food prices during a visit to an Illinois farm on Wednesday. He will also announce new measures to support U.S. farmers, including increasing the number of counties eligible for double cropping insurance and boosting funding for domestic fertilizer production, according to the White House.

Biden considers executive orders, new funds for abortion

President Joe Biden is considering executive orders and other measures to increase access and funding for women if the U.S. Supreme Court votes to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion, officials and sources with knowledge of the matter said. An unprecedented leak of an initial draft majority opinion from the Supreme Court, published by Politico last week, showed the court is set to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision that said the U.S. Constitution protects a woman's right to choose to have an abortion.

Arizona to resume lethal injections 8 years after 'botched' execution

Arizona was preparing for its first execution since 2014 on Wednesday, with an inmate convicted of killing a student scheduled to be put to death eight years after the state carried out its last lethal injection, described by lawyers as botched.

Clarence Wayne Dixon, convicted of fatally stabbing and strangling Arizona State University student Deana Bowdoin in 1978, was scheduled to die at 10 a.m. local time at the state prison in Florence, Arizona.

Senators rebuke U.S. trade chief over lack of consultation

A contingent of six U.S. senators led by Democrats on Tuesday chastised U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai about her handling of negotiations on COVID-19 vaccine intellectual property rights, saying she had failed to consult them. The members of the Senate Finance Committee, including Chairman Ron Wyden and two other of Tai's fellow Democrats, said in a letter https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/05102022%20USTR%20Consultation%20and%20Transparency%20Letter.pdf she had not complied with requirements to inform and consult them.

Trump-backed candidates lose in Nebraska, win in West Virginia

Donald Trump's favored candidate fell short in Nebraska's Republican primary election for governor on Tuesday, but the former president's pick prevailed in a congressional primary contest in West Virginia. Tuesday's elections delivered a split result for Trump, who has endorsed more than 150 candidates as he tries to shape his Republican Party ahead of a possible 2024 presidential run.

U.S. House Democrats seek new environmental review of postal delivery contract

A U.S. House of Representatives committee on Wednesday will consider a bill that seeks to invalidate a U.S. Postal Service (USPS) environmental review conducted as part of its deal to buy 50,000 next-generation delivery vehicles. House Oversight and Reform chair Carolyn Maloney is introducing legislation that would toss out the environmental review and compel USPS to conduct a new one. The White House and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) previously asked USPS to reconsider.

U.S. Senate Democrats put the abortion-rights bill to the test Wednesday

Democrats in the U.S. Senate plan to force a vote on Wednesday on legislation codifying women's rights to abortion nationwide, a protest gesture that is almost certain to fail ahead of an expected Supreme Court decision to end those protections. Most Senate Republicans oppose abortion and Democrats' razor-thin majority will not be enough to overcome the chamber's rules requiring 60 of the 100 members to agree to advance most legislation. But Democrats are hoping the vote will bolster their chances of holding or even picking up seats in the Nov. 8 midterm elections.

U.S. House passes $40 billion bill to bolster Ukraine against Russian invasion

The U.S. House of Representatives approved more than $40 billion more aid for Ukraine on Tuesday, as Congress races to keep military aid flowing and boost the government in Kyiv as it grapples with the Russian invasion. The House passed the Ukraine spending bill by 368 to 57, with every 'no' vote coming from Republicans. The measure now heads to the Senate, which is expected to act quickly.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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