US Domestic News Roundup: Explainer: A judge ruled the U.S. must keep expelling asylum seekers. What happens now?; U.S. motorists overlook high gas prices, plan to hit road for Memorial Day and more

Despite the setback, the administration is moving ahead with other changes at the border in an attempt to advance Biden's plans to better manage migrant arrivals, including rolling out a new rule that aims to speed up the processing of asylum claims next week. U.S. motorists overlook high gas prices, plan to hit road for Memorial Day U.S. Memorial Day weekend travel is expected to be the busiest in two years as more American drivers hit the road and shake off coronavirus lock-ins despite high fuel prices.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 24-05-2022 18:40 IST | Created: 24-05-2022 18:32 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: Explainer: A judge ruled the U.S. must keep expelling asylum seekers. What happens now?; U.S. motorists overlook high gas prices, plan to hit road for Memorial Day and more
Representative image Image Credit: Flickr

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

Explainer: A judge ruled the U.S. must keep expelling asylum seekers. What happens now?

The administration of U.S. President Joe Biden said it would appeal the decision of a Louisiana judge that upended its plans to end a COVID-era health order blocking most asylum seekers and other migrants at the border with Mexico. Despite the setback, the administration is moving ahead with other changes at the border in an attempt to advance Biden's plans to better manage migrant arrivals, including rolling out a new rule that aims to speed up the processing of asylum claims next week.

U.S. motorists overlook high gas prices, plan to hit road for Memorial Day

U.S. Memorial Day weekend travel is expected to be the busiest in two years as more American drivers hit the road and shake off coronavirus lock-ins despite high fuel prices. The kickoff to the summer U.S. driving season may indicate just how much consumers are willing to tolerate fuel price increases. Miles traveled by motorists rose 5.6% in the first three months of the year even as the price of a gallon of regular gasoline has jumped 50% in the last year, to more than $4.59 on average nationally, according to the American Automobile Association.

Texas AG Paxton squares off against Bush in the Republican run-off

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is expected to fend off a challenge on Tuesday from fellow Republican George P. Bush in a primary run-off election that has pitted a Trump ally against the scion of two former U.S. presidents. Paxton has consistently led in polling in his re-election bid for a third term, though surveys have tightened in recent weeks. He beat out Bush, the state's land commissioner, for former President Donald Trump's endorsement, despite a longstanding securities fraud indictment and other legal woes.

Abortion injects urgency into Democratic Cuellar-Cisneros rematch in Texas

Centrist U.S. Representative Henry Cuellar seeks to hold off progressive challenger Jessica Cisneros on Tuesday in a high-profile south Texas Democratic primary battle that illustrates sharp dividing lines over immigration and abortion rights. The election in a district along the U.S.-Mexico border is the third contest between Cuellar, who has held the seat since 2005, and Cisneros, a 28-year-old attorney who failed to unseat him in 2020 but forced him to a runoff in the state's March primary this year.

New York police release images of suspect in fatal subway shooting

New York City police on Monday released surveillance images of a suspect in the fatal shooting of a 48-year-old man in a subway car over the weekend, an apparently random attack that came less than two months after a mass shooting on the transit system. New York Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell in a Twitter message shared two photos of the person believed to have shot a straphanger on Sunday morning and sought the public's assistance in tracking him down.

U.S. agency issues order to speed baby formula ingredient deliveries

The U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) said it was issuing a national emergency declaration to waive hours-of-service requirements for commercial vehicle drivers transporting baby formula ingredients and packaging. The order comes in the wake of a product recall by top baby formula maker Abbott Laboratories, and the closing of its manufacturing plant in Sturgis, Michigan during an investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that has created one of the biggest infant formula shortages in recent history for U.S. families.

Backing Trump foe, Pence asks Republicans to focus on the future

Former Vice President Mike Pence campaigned for one of his ex-boss' nemeses on Monday night in the Republican primary for governor of Georgia, urging voters not to dwell on the past. Ahead of Tuesday's voting, Pence did not directly criticize former President Donald Trump in a speech on behalf of incumbent Brian Kemp nor name David Perdue, the former senator whom Trump has backed in the race.

Georgia Republicans seen dealing Trump's first major defeat in midterm endorsements

Georgia Republicans are expected to reject Donald Trump's campaign to oust Governor Brian Kemp in Tuesday's primary election, though polls show they are likely to back the former football star he has endorsed in their U.S. Senate primary. The former president has backed primary challenges to Kemp and Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for rejecting his attempts to overturn his 2020 election defeat, which he falsely claims was the result of widespread fraud.

App to help blind people navigate public transit to debut in Washington

An app designed to help visually impaired or blind pedestrians use public transit will debut at a Washington subway station on Tuesday. Waymap aims to expand travel options for blind and visually impaired people with step-by-step audio directions that it says are accurate up to 3 feet (0.9 meters) throughout a trip.

FBI counts 61 'active shooter' incidents last year, up 52% from 2020

The United States experienced 61 "active shooter" incidents last year, up sharply in the sheer number of attacks, casualties and geographic distribution from 2021 and the highest tally in over 20 years, the FBI reported on Monday. The 2021 total, spread over 30 states, was 52% higher than 2020 and about double each of the three previous years, according to the FBI.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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