US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. Senate hopeful Fetterman seeks to calm health worries at Pennsylvania rally; U.S. abortion clinic moves up the street to escape one state's ban and more

Biden's remarks about national unity on the 21st anniversary of the attacks stood in contrast to his warnings in recent days about dangerous divisions in American society, including that some Republicans who support former President Donald Trump's agenda pose a threat to democracy. U.S. Supreme Court to reopen to public after long COVID closure - reports The U.S. Supreme Court will allow the public to hear arguments in person for the first time in about 2-1/2 years following a closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Chief Justice John Roberts said late on Friday, according to media reports.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 12-09-2022 18:38 IST | Created: 12-09-2022 18:28 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. Senate hopeful Fetterman seeks to calm health worries at Pennsylvania rally; U.S. abortion clinic moves up the street to escape one state's ban and more
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Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

U.S. Senate hopeful Fetterman seeks to calm health worries at Pennsylvania rally

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate John Fetterman on Sunday sought to allay concerns about his health after suffering a near-fatal stroke earlier this year, at a campaign rally focused on abortion rights in suburban Philadelphia. Speaking at times in a halting and clipped fashion, Fetterman took aim at his Republican opponent in Pennsylvania's Senate race, celebrity physician Mehmet Oz, for questioning his fitness to serve. "Unfortunately," he said, "I have a doctor in my life doing that."

U.S. abortion clinic moves up the street to escape one state's ban

The women's health clinic in Bristol, Tennessee, had a seemingly simple solution to continue providing abortions after its home state banned the procedure this summer: It moved a mile up the road to Bristol, Virginia, where abortion remained legal.

But relocating between the twin cities brought a host of challenges.

Payments giants to apply new code identifying sales at U.S. gun stores

Visa Inc, the world's largest payments processor, said on Saturday it will implement a new merchant category code for U.S. gun retailers, which will identify transactions at firearms stores. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) approved the creation of the merchant code on Friday following pressure from gun-control activists who say it will help track suspicious weapons purchases.

Flash floods hit Chicago metro area, stranding cars

The National Weather Service on Sunday issued a flash flood warning for part of northeastern Illinois including Chicago's northern metro area, after heavy rains flooded viaducts, stranded cars, and sent water surging into basements. Chicagoans shared photos and videos on social media of cars partially submerged beneath underpasses and plumes of water shooting up from sidewalks.

Biden executive order to fund U.S. biomanufacturing industry

President Joe Biden will sign orders on Monday to push more government dollars to the U.S. biotechnology industry, aimed at reducing dependence on China for materials to generate clean energy, weave new fabrics and inoculate populations against the COVID-19 pandemic. The executive order allows the federal government to direct funding for the use of microbes and other biologically derived resources to make new foods, fertilizers and seeds, as well as to make mining operations more efficient, administration officials said.

On 9/11 anniversary, Biden recalls American unity, vows vigilance

U.S. President Joe Biden invoked the memory of America's united response to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks by al Qaeda and vowed to "never give up" in the face of terrorist threats in solemn commemoration on Sunday at the Pentagon. Biden's remarks about national unity on the 21st anniversary of the attacks stood in contrast to his warnings in recent days about dangerous divisions in American society, including that some Republicans who support former President Donald Trump's agenda pose a threat to democracy.

U.S. Supreme Court to reopen to public after long COVID closure - reports

The U.S. Supreme Court will allow the public to hear arguments in person for the first time in about 2-1/2 years following a closure due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Chief Justice John Roberts said late on Friday, according to media reports. The court's nine justices - all of whom have been vaccinated against COVID-19 - will begin hearing a new round of cases when the court's next term kicks off on Oct. 3.

As California wildfire rages, volunteers help rescue horses, livestock

When a wildfire began spreading out of control near her small ranch in Hemet, California, last Monday, Debby Taylor had one major concern: how to protect her donkeys. She wrote her phone number on their halters, in case she was forced to set them loose. By Tuesday, however, the animals were on their way to a local thoroughbred horse farm, thanks to a network of local volunteers who sprang into action in recent days to rescue hundreds of horses, goats and other animals from the raging Fairview fire.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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