US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. bank CEOs set for congressional grilling by Democrats and Republicans; TikTok to verify political accounts in U.S., ban campaign fundraising and more

In testimony before the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee, the CEOs will tout their financial strength, role in distributing billions of dollars in COVID-19 pandemic-related aid and efforts both to boost lending in poorer communities and diversity within their ranks, according to statements released on Tuesday ahead of the hearing. Washington Monument vandalized, one man taken into custody A man has been taken into custody after the Washington Monument was vandalized late on Tuesday, police said, adding that the area around the base of the monument has been temporarily closed.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 21-09-2022 18:43 IST | Created: 21-09-2022 18:28 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. bank CEOs set for congressional grilling by Democrats and Republicans; TikTok to verify political accounts in U.S., ban campaign fundraising and more
Representative Image Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

U.S. bank CEOs set for congressional grilling by Democrats and Republicans

The chief executives of JPMorgan, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo and other major U.S. banks are set to be grilled by both Democratic and Republican lawmakers on Wednesday on the economy, consumer protections and the lenders' stance on fossil fuel lending and firearms, among other issues. In testimony before the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee, the CEOs will tout their financial strength, role in distributing billions of dollars in COVID-19 pandemic-related aid and efforts both to boost lending in poorer communities and diversity within their ranks, according to statements released on Tuesday ahead of the hearing.

TikTok to verify political accounts in U.S., ban campaign fundraising

TikTok will begin requiring accounts belonging to U.S. government departments, politicians and political parties to be verified and will ban videos aimed at campaign fundraising, the short-form video app said on Wednesday. The move comes as TikTok, owned by China's ByteDance, and other social media platforms are working to clamp down on political misinformation ahead of the U.S. midterm elections in November, after years of being criticized for allowing such content to flourish on their services.

Washington Monument vandalized, one man taken into custody

A man has been taken into custody after the Washington Monument was vandalized late on Tuesday, police said, adding that the area around the base of the monument has been temporarily closed. "Area around base of the Washington Monument temporarily closed. USPP have adult male in custody for vandalism. NPS (National Park Service) conservators will work on restoration process," the United States Park Police (USPP) said on Twitter.

Eight hospitalized in Chicago building explosion

A red-brick building partially collapsed in an explosion on Chicago's West Side on Tuesday, sending eight people to the hospital, including three who were in serious or critical condition, the city's fire department said. Images and a video clip posted by the fire department showed damaged top floors at West Washington Boulevard and North Central Avenue. The video showed bricks scattered around the corner building and parked cars damaged from fallen debris.

Factbox-Five states have abortion initiatives on their U.S. midterms ballot

Voters in five states will consider abortion-related ballot measures in the Nov. 8 election, initiatives that have taken on new urgency after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide. In August, voters in conservative Kansas defeated a ballot measure aimed at eliminating abortion rights from the state's constitution. Here is a look at the upcoming votes:

U.S. rents surge, leaving behind a generation of younger workers

The cost of renting a home in the United States is surging and young workers have felt the sharpest pain, many of them taking on additional jobs or roommates to afford housing costs. Household rents in 2021 jumped 10% from pre-pandemic levels, according to Census Bureau estimates released last week. The figures came as rising healthcare and rental costs pushed U.S. consumer prices up unexpectedly last month.

U.S. Congress' Jan. 6 committee plans next hearing for Sept. 28

The U.S. House of Representatives committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol is planning to hold its next hearing on Sept. 28, the panel's chairman said on Tuesday. Representative Bennie Thompson told reporters he expected the public hearing would be the panel's last, unless something else happens.

Judge asks Trump's lawyers if he declassified records in FBI search

The U.S. judge named to review documents seized by the FBI last month at Donald Trump's Florida home pressed Trump's lawyers on Tuesday to say whether they plan to assert that the records had been declassified by the former president, as he has claimed. Judge Raymond Dearie - serving as an independent arbiter, or special master, to vet the more than 11,000 seized documents and potentially recommend keeping some away from federal investigators - asked Trump's lawyers why he should not consider records marked classified as genuinely classified.

Delaware braces for migrant flight in U.S. political standoff

Local government officials, advocates and reporters swarmed a small coastal airport near President Joe Biden's vacation home in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, on Tuesday in anticipation of a possible flight carrying migrants from Texas. Flight tracking websites showed a scheduled flight set to leave San Antonio, Texas, heading to Georgetown, Delaware, on Tuesday chartered by the same company that was used by Florida's Republican governor Ron DeSantis to send migrants to the wealthy island of Martha's Vineyard last week.

Trump ally sues U.S. Justice Department, demands return of seized cellphone

My Pillow Inc's chief executive, Mike Lindell, an ally of former President Donald Trump, sued the U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday seeking the return of his cellphone, which FBI agents seized last week. In his suit in federal court in Minnesota, Lindell said the agents stopped him at a fast-food restaurant's drive-through window and questioned him about his claims that the 2020 U.S. election was rigged.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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