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Science News Roundup: NorthStar and Thales Alenia Space begin work on satellites; On the moon, water water everywhere and more

On the moon, water water everywhere and not a drop to drink (yet) The moon lacks the bodies of liquid water that are a hallmark of Earth but scientists said on Monday lunar water is more widespread than previously known, with water molecules trapped within mineral grains on the surface and more water perhaps hidden in ice patches residing in permanent shadows.

Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 28-10-2020 02:38 IST | Created: 28-10-2020 02:30 IST
Science News Roundup: NorthStar and Thales Alenia Space begin work on satellites; On the moon, water water everywhere and more

Following is a summary of current science news briefs.

NorthStar and Thales Alenia Space begin work on satellites to combat space collisions

Canada's NorthStar Earth & Space and Thales Alenia Space said on Tuesday they will begin work on a commercial satellite system to combat the threat of collisions in space. NorthStar, an information service company, said it has contracted Thales Alenia Space, a joint venture between France's Thales and Italy's Leonardo, to build the first three satellites of its "Skylark" constellation.

On the moon, water water everywhere and not a drop to drink (yet)

The moon lacks the bodies of liquid water that are a hallmark of Earth but scientists said on Monday lunar water is more widespread than previously known, with water molecules trapped within mineral grains on the surface and more water perhaps hidden in ice patches residing in permanent shadows. While research 11 years ago indicated water was relatively widespread in small amounts on the moon, a team of scientists is now reporting the first unambiguous detection of water molecules on the lunar surface. At the same time, another team is reporting that the moon possesses roughly 15,000 square miles (40,000 square kilometers) of permanent shadows that potentially could harbor hidden pockets of water in the form of ice.

COVID-19 heart changes raise death risk; virus may be lead killer of young adults during surges

The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Higher death risk found if COVID-19 causes changes to heart.

(With inputs from agencies.)


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