Science News Roundup: Chile's ALMA seeks to double capacity in a decade after a slow re-opening; Ghana startup strives for greater African representation in cancer research and more

Hundreds of other samples bobbed around him in plastic jars of formaldehyde, but this one would soon travel across town to Yemaachi Biotech, a Ghanaian research and diagnostics startup that Akakpo thinks could change African cancer studies forever. Omicron breakthrough infections may spare young hearts; no need to delay mammogram after vaccination The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 25-05-2022 18:42 IST | Created: 25-05-2022 18:32 IST
Science News Roundup: Chile's ALMA seeks to double capacity in a decade after a slow re-opening; Ghana startup strives for greater African representation in cancer research and more
Representative image Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current science news briefs.

Chile's ALMA seeks to double capacity in a decade after a slow re-opening

Now that Chile's ALMA Observatory is running at full force after the COVID-19 pandemic caused its first shutdown, its director is hoping to double its capacity to better understand black holes. "We're looking to enhance the capabilities of ALMA over the next 10 years," said Sean Dougherty, ALMA's director.

Ghana startup strives for greater African representation in cancer research

In the open-air kitchen of a small research clinic in Ghana's capital, Accra, pathologist Kafui Akakpo carefully carved a piece of cancerous breast tissue into a sample smaller than a matchbox. Hundreds of other samples bobbed around him in plastic jars of formaldehyde, but this one would soon travel across town to Yemaachi Biotech, a Ghanaian research and diagnostics startup that Akakpo thinks could change African cancer studies forever.

Climate change boosted the odds of recent deadly heat in India, and Pakistan, scientists say

South Asia's deadly heatwave in March and April was made 30 times more likely because of climate change, scientists reported Monday. As April temperatures hit nearly 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) in parts of northern India and Pakistan, at least 90 people died from heat-related causes, officials have said. The heatwave, which had delivered record temperatures in India in March, also badly damaged the country's winter wheat crop.

Ancient massive 'Dragon of Death' flying reptile dug up in Argentina

Argentine scientists discovered a new species of a huge flying reptile dubbed "The Dragon of Death" that lived 86 million of years ago alongside dinosaurs, in a find shedding fresh insight on a predator whose body was as long as a yellow school bus. The new specimen of ancient flying reptile, or pterosaur, measured around 30 feet (9 meters) long and researchers say it predated birds as among the first creatures on Earth to use wings to hunt its prey from prehistoric skies.

Climate action on CO2 emissions alone won't prevent extreme warming - study

To control climate change, the world must go beyond cutting carbon dioxide emissions and curb lesser-known pollutants such as nitrous oxide playing a key role in warming the planet, new research suggests. Decades of global climate discussions have focused on CO2 emissions, which are most abundant in the atmosphere. The common goal of reaching "net-zero" emissions refers most often to CO2 emissions alone.

Omicron breakthrough infections may spare young hearts; no need to delay mammogram after vaccination

The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They include research that warrants further study to corroborate the findings and that has yet to be certified by peer review. Omicron breakthrough infections may spare young hearts

Boeing Starliner capsule nears completion of pivotal test flight to orbit

The new Boeing Starliner capsule was due to descend back to Earth on Wednesday from its first uncrewed journey to the International Space Station (ISS), completing a high-stakes test flight as NASA's next vehicle for carrying humans to orbit. Less than a week after its launch from the Cape Canaveral U.S. Space Force Base in Florida, the CST-100 Starliner was scheduled to autonomously undock from the space station at 2:36 p.m. EDT (1836 GMT) to embark on a five-hour-plus return flight.

Scientists make way for gene-edited tomatoes as vegan source of vitamin D

If British scientists have their way, two medium-sized tomatoes a day could keep the doctor away. A research team led by scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich have edited the genetic makeup of tomatoes to become a robust source of vitamin D, which regulates nutrients like calcium that are imperative to keeping bones, teeth and muscles healthy.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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