US: Tornado emergency issued for Little Rock and nearby areas

tornadoes, damaging winds, and large hail, said Northern Illinois meteorology professor and tornado expert Victor Gensini.People in those areas should stock emergency supplies, prepare for power outages, avoid getting stranded in places vulnerable to falling trees or severe hail, and park vehicles in garages if possible, meteorologists said.Forecasters warned of a relatively rare, significant severe weather threat around Chicago that could include powerful winds, tornadoes and large hail.In Iowa City, the University of Iowa canceled Fridays watch party for fans who planned to gather for the womens basketball Final Four game against South Carolina.


PTI | Mississippi | Updated: 01-04-2023 07:00 IST | Created: 01-04-2023 07:00 IST
US: Tornado emergency issued for Little Rock and nearby areas
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The US National Weather Service issued a tornado emergency for Arkansas's capital of Little Rock and surrounding areas on Friday, warning that 350,000 people are in danger from a "confirmed large and destructive tornado." Forecasters say "a large and destructive" tornado touched down Friday afternoon in Little Rock and North Little Rock. The violent twister was seen in video posted online plowing through neighborhoods and business districts of Little Rock and surrounding areas. Aerial footage showed several rooftops reduced to splinters in Little Rock and nearby Benton, vehicles were toppled over and debris was scattered across roadways.

There were no immediate reports of injuries.

Passengers and airport employees at Clinton National Airport in Little Rock took shelter in bathrooms.

Massive storms brewing over at least 15 states in the Midwest and southern US on Friday have meteorologists urging people to brace for dangerous weather including tornadoes, saying the conditions are similar to those a week ago that unleashed a devastating twister that killed at least 21 people in Mississippi.

More than 85 million people were under weather advisories Friday as the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center forecast an unusually large outbreak of thunderstorms with the potential to cause hail, damaging wind gusts and strong tornadoes that could move for long distances over the ground.

The area at greatest risk for storms on Friday follows a large stretch of the Mississippi River from Wisconsin all the way to Mississippi, with rare high-risk advisories centered around Memphis; and between Davenport, Iowa, and Quincy, Illinois and surrounding areas.

Forecasters issued tornado watches over both high-risk regions until Friday evening, with the weather service expecting numerous tornadoes and calling it a "particularly dangerous situation." All told, by Friday afternoon, tornado watches issued by the National Weather Service cover most of Missouri, Arkansas and Iowa; western Illinois; and parts of Wisconsin, Texas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Mississippi. Tornado warnings were issued for isolated areas of Arkansas, Missouri and Illinois on Friday afternoon.

The "intense supercell thunderstorms '' predicted for Friday afternoon are only expected to become more common, especially in Southern states, as temperatures rise around the world.

Apart from Little Rock, the major population centers at high risk for storms starting Friday afternoon include Chicago; St. Louis; Jonesboro, Arkansas; and Des Moines and Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

"There will be lots of thunderstorms ... tornadoes, damaging winds, and large hail," said Northern Illinois meteorology professor and tornado expert Victor Gensini.

People in those areas should stock emergency supplies, prepare for power outages, avoid getting stranded in places vulnerable to falling trees or severe hail, and park vehicles in garages if possible, meteorologists said.

Forecasters warned of a "relatively rare, significant severe weather threat" around Chicago that could include powerful winds, tornadoes and large hail.

In Iowa City, the University of Iowa canceled Friday's watch party for fans who planned to gather for the women's basketball Final Four game against South Carolina. Deputy Director of Athletics Matt Henderson said in a statement the decision was made "due to the unpredictable timing of possible severe weather and potential storm impact." Last Friday night, a vicious tornado in Mississippi killed at least 21 people, injured dozens and flattened entire blocks as it carved a path of destruction for more than an hour. About 2,000 homes were damaged or destroyed, according to the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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