Science News Roundup: COVID worsens asthma in children; booster after infection not as beneficial vs Omicron; Rocket Lab catches, drops rocket booster with a helicopter in key reusability test and more

Following is a summary of current science news briefs. COVID worsens asthma in children; booster after infection not as beneficial vs Omicron The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 04-05-2022 19:05 IST | Created: 04-05-2022 18:31 IST
Science News Roundup: COVID worsens asthma in children; booster after infection not as beneficial vs Omicron; Rocket Lab catches, drops rocket booster with a helicopter in key reusability test and more
Representative Image Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current science news briefs.

COVID worsens asthma in children; booster after infection not as beneficial vs Omicron

The following is a summary of some recent studies on COVID-19. They include research that warrants further study to corroborate the findings and that has yet to be certified by peer review. COVID-19 worsens asthma in children

Rocket Lab catches, drops rocket booster with a helicopter in key reusability test

Small launch firm Rocket Lab USA Inc on Monday captured a falling rocket stage out of the air with a helicopter before dropping it in the ocean, appearing to achieve a partially successful test of the company's novel cost-savings approach to recovering used rockets for multiple mission to space. The demonstration, involving parachutes and a long cable hanging from a helicopter, sought to check off a key milestone for the Long Beach, California-based company as it ventures to slash the cost of sending things into space, an industry trend pioneered by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk's SpaceX.

White House to boost support for quantum technology while boosting cybersecurity

The White House on Wednesday will announce a slate of measures to support quantum technology in the United States while laying out steps to boost cybersecurity to defend against the next generation of supercomputers. The U.S. and other nations are in a race to develop quantum technology, which could fuel advances in artificial intelligence, materials science, and chemistry. Quantum computers, the main focus of the effort, can operate millions of times faster than today's advanced supercomputers.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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