Google doddle on Norwegian flag to tribute Norway's Constitution Day


Devdiscourse News Desk | Oslo | Updated: 17-05-2021 07:30 IST | Created: 17-05-2021 07:25 IST
Google doddle on Norwegian flag to tribute Norway's Constitution Day
In 1899 that girls were allowed to join in the parade for the first time. Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons
  • Country:
  • Norway

Today's Doodle pays honor to Norway Constitution Day, also known as Syttende Mai, a national holiday observed on the anniversary of the signing of the modern constitution. Whether you're within Norwegian borders or an expat living abroad, national pride is celebrated by Norwegians everywhere.

The Constitution of Norway was signed at Eidsvoll on 17 May 1814. The constitution declared Norway to be an independent kingdom in an attempt to avoid being ceded to Sweden after Denmark–Norway's devastating defeat in the Napoleonic Wars.

In 1899 that girls were allowed to join in the parade for the first time. In 1905, the union with Sweden was dissolved and Prince Carl of Denmark was chosen to be King of an independent Norway, under the name Haakon VII. This ended any Swedish concern for the activities of the National

In 1833 Norway's national poet Henrik Wergeland held a public address to the country, and from this occasion forward, May 17 has been celebrated as a national day. After 1864 Norway Constitution Day became more established when the first children's parade was launched in Christiania, at first consisting only of boys.

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HenrikWergeland first started the children's parade at Eidsvoll around 1820. In 1870, the Norway Constitution Day holiday became more focused around children based on an initiative led by the author of Norway's national anthem, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson.

Even though people of all ages celebrate Constitution Day, children continue to be the center of attention of today's holiday. All parades begin or end with speeches. Both grown-ups and older children are invited to speak. After the parades, there are games for the children, and often much ice cream, pop, sweets, and hot-dogs are consumed.

Syttende Mai is also celebrated in many Norwegian migrant communities throughout the world, with traditional foods, sometimes including lutefisk. In the United States and Canada, the local lodges of the Sons of Norway often play a central part in organizing the festivities.

The Norwegian flag, depicted in the Doodle artwork, will be seen flying across the country. A blue Nordic cross outlined in white against a red background of the flag reflects the Scandinavian country's history and pride.

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