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Hannah Glasse: Mother of the modern dinner party

The book was printed in 20 editions in the 18th century and was published till 1843.


Devdiscourse News Desk
Updated: 11-06-2019 10:43 IST
Hannah Glasse: Mother of the modern dinner party

In its 1751 edition, she mentioned jelly and trifle as the ingredient, and 1774 edition included one of the first recipes in English for the Indian style curry. (Image credit: Google)

Google Doodle is celebrating the 310th birth anniversary of Hannah Glasse. She was an English cookery writer and is remembered for her cookbook: The Art of Cookery made Plain an easy which was published in 1747.

This book was again printed in 20 editions in the 18th century and was published till 1843. The book was the best seller of the century.

Glasse mostly wrote for domestic servants and in a manner that was familiar to anyone, she included staples ingredients in her recipes such as gooseberry fool and Yorkshire. Her book covered 972 recipes, including food for the sick.

In its 1751 edition, she mentioned jelly and trifle as the ingredient, and 1774 edition included one of the first recipes in English for the Indian style curry.

Hannah was born in London and was married to an Irish soldier John Glasse. In 1754 she became bankrupt and was forced to auction her copyright for The Art of Cookery. In 1755 she repaid the sum of 500 pounds which she borrowed from Sir Henry Bendingfeld.

In 1757 she registered three shares in the new book, The Servants Directory which was written on the managing of a household, although it was not commercially successful venture, its plagiarized editions became popular in North America.

In 2006, BBC drama-documentary used Glasse as the subject and called her the "mother of the modern dinner party" and "the first domestic goddess."