Health News Roundup: Roche's Xolair reduces reactions to severe food allergies in study and more What Alabama ruling means for patients with frozen embryos: one woman's story

After Alabama's supreme court ruled on Feb. 16 that embryos were children, leaving it unclear how to legally store, transport and use them, Rumbley, 44, is seeking legal and medical advice on sending her last two embryos out of state as soon as possible. Roche's Xolair reduces reactions to severe food allergies in study Xolair, a 20-year-old asthma drug sold by Roche and Novartis, significantly reduced allergic reactions in people with multiple severe food allergies in a late-stage trial, researchers reported on Sunday at a medical meeting.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 26-02-2024 11:36 IST | Created: 26-02-2024 10:29 IST
Health News Roundup: Roche's Xolair reduces reactions to severe food allergies in study and more What Alabama ruling means for patients with frozen embryos: one woman's story
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Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

What Alabama ruling means for patients with frozen embryos: one woman's story

Three of Kristia Rumbley's embryos created at a clinic became her 7-year-old twins and 2-year-old son, while three have sat in freezers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham for eight years in case she and her husband decide to have another kid. After Alabama's supreme court ruled on Feb. 16 that embryos were children, leaving it unclear how to legally store, transport and use them, Rumbley, 44, is seeking legal and medical advice on sending her last two embryos out of state as soon as possible.

Roche's Xolair reduces reactions to severe food allergies in study

Xolair, a 20-year-old asthma drug sold by Roche and Novartis, significantly reduced allergic reactions in people with multiple severe food allergies in a late-stage trial, researchers reported on Sunday at a medical meeting. Based on the results, presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology meeting in Washington, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug earlier this month for adults and children age 1 year or older for reducing allergic reactions that may occur from accidental exposure.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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