Israeli court dismisses Amnesty's petition against spyware firm NSO

Amnesty's Israel branch said a "mountain of evidence was ignored" and called the court "a rubber stamp to the Defence Ministry's impunity to human rights violations". A study by the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab has linked NSO technology to political surveillance in Mexico, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.

Reuters | Updated: 13-07-2020 18:24 IST | Created: 13-07-2020 18:06 IST
Israeli court dismisses Amnesty's petition against spyware firm NSO
Representative image Image Credit: ANI

An Israeli court has dismissed Amnesty International's legal bid to stop NSO Group from exporting surveillance software, saying the rights organization did not prove NSO's technology had been used to spy on its members.

Amnesty alleged that governments around the world have used the Israeli company's cellphone-hacking software, Pegasus, to crack down on activists, and petitioned to get NSO's export license revoked. A Tel Aviv District Court judge, however, found Amnesty did not present evidence to back up the claim that there had been an attempt to spy by hacking a human rights activist's phone, nor that such an attempt had been carried out by NSO, according to a court document.

The judge also ruled that Israel's Defence Ministry has enough safeguards in place to protect human rights in its export licensing process. Amnesty's Israel branch said a "mountain of evidence was ignored" and called the court "rubber stamp to the Defence Ministry's impunity to human rights violations".

A study by the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab has linked NSO technology to political surveillance in Mexico, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia. Targets of the alleged hacking spree included diplomats, political dissidents, journalists, and senior government officials. NSO, whose customers include law enforcement and governments around the world, has denied the allegations. After the court decision, it said it will "continue to supply technology to countries and intelligence agencies that are meant to save lives."

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Blockchain in Healthcare: Opportunities and challenges

The use of blockchain in healthcare is a relatively new innovation with many of its uses still being explored and related technologies being developed, improved, and scaled. ...

Debate surrounding vaccine passports and development misses bigger picture

... ...

Blockchain vs IOTA: Looking for a better alternative

... ...

For stability, Iraq needs to crack down on corruption

... ...

Videos

Latest News

Reuters Sports News Summary

Following is a summary of current sports news briefs.NBA roundup Russell Westbrook passes Big Os mark in Wizards lossWashingtons Russell Westbrook got his record-setting 182nd career triple-double on Monday, but the Atlanta Hawks came away ...

Reuters US Domestic News Summary

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.Rationals vs. radicals Anti-Trump Republicans threaten third partyOver 100 former Republican officials will sign a letter on Thursday declaring that if the Republican Party does not ...

Locals defy COVID norms at Hyderabad's Charminar area

Several people flouted COVID norms while shopping for Eid at the markets of Hyderabad on Tuesday. From Charminar to Madina, all the bazaars in the city remained jam packed on Tuesday after the government announced a statewide lockdown start...

Reuters World News Summary

Following is a summary of current world news briefs.Prosecutors shelve case over Cairo hotel gang rape allegation for insufficent evidenceEgypts public prosecutors have shelved a case over a womans allegation that she was gang raped at a lu...

Give Feedback