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Flapshell turtle rescued in residential area in Agra


Devdiscourse News Desk agra India
Updated: 30-11-2018 18:44 IST
Flapshell turtle rescued in residential area in Agra

An Indian Flapshell turtle who was in danger of being attacked by wild dogs was rescued from a residential area here, a wildlife NGO said Friday.

The turtle was kept under observation for a few hours and later released in Keetham Lake, once deemed fit by veterinarians, the Wildlife SOS said.

The reptile, seen by a local who was out for a walk at a neighbourhood park, was in danger of being attacked by wild dogs. A two-member team of the NGO intervened and rescued the turtle.

The Indian flapshell turtle is a freshwater species found in South Asia. It is listed under Schedule I of the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and thereby is granted the same level of protection as the tiger.

Poaching or the possession of any protected wildlife species and the illegal trade of their body parts is a criminal offence leading to imprisonment for three to seven years.

An Indian Flapshell Turtle was rescued by Wildlife SOS

after it was spotted in a park near a residential colony in Vijay Vihar located

in Shahganj, Agra.

The turtle was kept under observation for a few hours and later released in Keetham Lake, once deemed fit by the Wildlife

SOS veterinarians.

While out for a walk in the neighbourhood

park, a concerned resident chanced upon a rather unexpected animal. A turtle,

later identified as a Flapshell turtle was in danger of being attacked by feral

dogs. A two-member team rescued it.

The Indian Flapshell

Turtle (Lissemys punctata) is a freshwater species found in South Asia.

It is

listed under Schedule I of the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and thereby is

granted the same level of protection as the tiger. Poaching or the possession of any protected

wildlife species and the illegal trade of their body parts is a criminal

offence leading to imprisonment for between three to seven years.

Suraj Sahani,

the person who called Wildlife SOS said, "I spotted the turtle in the park and intervened when I

heard some neighbourhood dogs barking at it. I am glad the Wildlife SOS team

responded quickly and that the turtle was in their safe hands."

Kartick

Satyanarayan, co-founder & CEO Wildlife SOS said, "We believe that the tortoise was kept

illegally and had been abandoned in the park. Flap shell turtles are poached

extensively for meat, considered a delicacy in some parts of Southeast

Asia. The body parts of these reptiles are also sold illegally due

to their supposed aphrodisiacal properties and for use in traditional Chinese

medicine. It is a commonly misguided belief that turtle shells possess

medicinal and healing properties and that consuming the shell can cure

tuberculosis and various skin diseases. However, there is no scientific and

medical proof to support such claims."

Baiju Raj

M.V., Director Conservation Projects, Wildlife SOS, said "We are glad to see that more and more

people are making a conscious decision to help out animals in distress. Turtles

are essential to the ecosystem as they clean the water bodies by mainly feeding

on plants that grow in water, small insects and even dead marine animals and

fish."

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DPB

(With inputs from agencies.)

COUNTRY : India

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