U.S. aviation regulator warns of new safety risks from pandemic

U.S. Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson warned on Tuesday of a changed industry in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic that has shaken air travel over the past year and created new safety risks that must be addressed. "The industry that existed last March in many respects no longer exists today," Dickson said at a town hall about commercial aviation safety shown on social media, citing the retirement of veteran pilots, new fleets with complex aircraft and less international flying.

Reuters | Washington DC | Updated: 24-02-2021 00:55 IST | Created: 24-02-2021 00:53 IST
U.S. aviation regulator warns of new safety risks from pandemic
Representative image Image Credit: ANI

U.S. Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson warned on Tuesday of a changed industry in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic that has shaken air travel over the past year and created new safety risks that must be addressed.

"The industry that existed last March in many respects no longer exists today," Dickson said at a town hall about commercial aviation safety shown on social media, citing the retirement of veteran pilots, new fleets with complex aircraft and less international flying. "All these changes are creating a whole new set of stressors that can inject new safety risks into the system," he said.

While the risk of a fatal U.S. commercial aviation accident has fallen by 94% since 1997 thanks to improvements in aviation safety, Dickson said the industry must proactively curb new safety risks by understanding the pandemic's impact. He cited added training and enhanced industry oversight as possible measures.

"COVID-19 has created a tremendous amount of disruption and change in our system with breathtaking speed," he said. Airlines have parked jets and drastically reduced their workforce, mostly through early retirement programs, as they weather a sharp downturn in demand as a result of the pandemic.

Separately, Dickson said the agency was acting quickly to finalize a new emergency airworthiness directive that would require stepped-up inspections of all Boeing 777-200 airplanes with Pratt & Whitney PW400 engines after an engine failure on a United Airlines flight forced an emergency landing on Saturday.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Addressing conflict-related sexual violence at long last

... ...

Why unequal access to coronavirus vaccines is a threat to us all

... ...

India’s love affair with fossil fuels: the path to sustainable development?

... ...

Videos

Latest News

Hawaii opens evacuation shelters after dam breach on Maui island

Heavy rains breached a dam on the Hawaiian island of Maui, prompting authorities to open evacuation shelters after ordering everyone in its vicinity and along the nearby coast to leave.The rains led to the cresting of the Kaupakalua dam in ...

South African regulator ICASA to appeal court order halting spectrum auction

South Africas telecoms regulator ICASA will appeal a court order restraining it from proceeding with auctioning much needed-spectrum, it said on Tuesday.The ruling is a setback for top mobile operators MTN and Vodacom, which are seeking to ...

Xinjiang firms seek damages from foreign researcher over forced labour reports -media

The official news outlet of the Communist Party of Chinas Xinjiang region said unidentified companies from the area have filed a domestic civil lawsuit seeking unspecified compensation from a U.S.-based human rights researcher whose reports...

S.Korea roiled by property scandal amid soaring house prices

Accusations that officials at South Koreas state housing corporation tried to use insider information to cash in on runaway property prices has thrown new fuel on an issue that is draining support from the ruling party ahead of key election...

Give Feedback