Safe Water Network highlights efforts in India, Ghana toward water access, solutions


PTI | Newyork | Updated: 22-11-2022 10:30 IST | Created: 22-11-2022 10:20 IST
Safe Water Network highlights efforts in India, Ghana toward water access, solutions
Representative Image Image Credit: ANI
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India's efforts at implementing automatic chlorination and pond rejuvenation to promote groundwater recharge by regenerating water bodies have been highlighted by the global non-profit ''Safe Water Network''.

Safe Water Network, co-founded by the late actor and philanthropist Paul Newman, while hosting the annual Water for All Ball here this month, told a gathering of leaders and experts how climate change is exacerbating current water access challenges, particularly water quality.

The Ball, co-hosted by Dr. Rita Colwell and former President and CEO of Quest Diagnostics Dr. Surya Mohapatra, raised funds to assist the organisation to achieve its goals of improving access to safe water for 50 million people by 2026.

In India, the teams are implementing automatic chlorination and pond rejuvenation to promote groundwater recharge by regenerating water bodies, a statement issued here said.

The teams in Ghana are using test kits onsite at community-owned and operated water stations to strengthen quality assurance and make real-time data-informed decisions.

Since 2009, Safe Water Network has worked closely with social entrepreneurs, women's groups, implementers, and government agencies to promote sustainable last-mile safe water solutions in India.

Safe Water Network's decentralised model reaches nearly two million people across Ghana and India while collaborating with both international and local partners to reach millions more, the statement said.

The iJal Women's Empowerment Programme piloted in Telangana's Medak district promotes female entrepreneurship by linking self-help groups (SHGs) to new sources of income.

Safe Water Network trains and equips women, who previously collected unsafe water for their families, with the skills and resources to become iJal operators also known as "Water Aunties".

Safe Water Network and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-pioneered the ''Water Aunties'' programme is helping to develop women social entrepreneurs in water ATMs, breaking the gender roles and poverty cycle.

Their role as safe water advocates transforms the health and well-being of their communities, generates livelihoods, and elevates their role in society, the statement said.

One of the key pillars of the Safe Water Network is to facilitate global collaboration and disseminate shared knowledge.

Environmental justice activist Catherine Coleman Flowers was awarded the inaugural Community Champion Award at the event.

Safe Water Network's mission is to develop and demonstrate affordable, economically viable solutions, share sector knowledge, and build partnerships that reach millions in underserved communities.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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