Left Menu
Development News Edition

Drug delays type 1 diabetes in people at high risk: Study

PTI | Washington DC | Updated: 10-06-2019 16:15 IST | Created: 10-06-2019 16:05 IST
Drug delays type 1 diabetes in people at high risk: Study
Image Credit: Flickr

In a first, scientists have developed a treatment that can delay type 1 diabetes by two or more years among people who are at high risk. The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved treatment with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (teplizumab).

Researchers from Yale University in the US enrolled 76 participants ages 8-49 who were relatives of people with type 1 diabetes, had at least two types of diabetes-related autoantibodies (proteins made by the immune system), and abnormal glucose (sugar) tolerance. Participants were randomly assigned to either the treatment group, which received a 14-day course of teplizumab or the control group, which received a placebo.

All participants received glucose tolerance tests regularly until the study was completed, or until they developed clinical type 1 diabetes -- whichever came first. During the trial, 72 per cent of people in the control group developed clinical diabetes, compared to only 43 per cent of the teplizumab group.

The median time for people in the control group to develop clinical diabetes was just over 24 months, while those who developed clinical diabetes in the treatment group had a median time of 48 months before progressing to diagnosis. Type 1 diabetes develops when the immune system's T cells mistakenly destroy the body's own insulin-producing beta cells. Insulin is needed to convert glucose into energy. Teplizumab targets T cells to lessen the destruction of beta cells.

"Previous clinical research found that teplizumab effectively slows the loss of beta cells in people with recent onset clinical type 1 diabetes, but the drug had never been tested in people who did not have the clinical disease," said Kevan C Herold, of Yale University. "We wanted to see whether the early intervention would have a benefit for people who are at high risk but do not yet have symptoms of type 1 diabetes," Herold.

The effects of the drug were greatest in the first year after it was given, when 41 per cent of participants developed clinical diabetes, mainly in the placebo group. Many factors, including age, could have contributed to the ability of teplizumab to delay clinical disease since at-risk children and adolescents are known to progress to type 1 diabetes faster than adults.

Faster progression of type 1 diabetes is associated with a highly active immune system, which may explain the impact of immune system-modulating drugs like teplizumab. Other data collected from the trial may help researchers to understand why certain people responded to treatment. Participants who responded to teplizumab tended to have certain autoantibodies and other immune system characteristics.

The research team also cautioned that the study had limitations, including the small number of participants, their lack of ethnic diversity, and that all participants were relatives of people with type 1 diabetes, potentially limiting the ability to translate the study broadly.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Download The Devdiscourse News App for Latest News.


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Education post-coronavirus: Schools to rush for more digitalization

Digital education would undoubtedly boom in the post-coronavirus world, supported by educational institutions that have discovered its efficiency during the crisis, but it is still not expected to outshine traditional classroom learning....

Public health care post-COVID 19 to go for revamping, not rebooting

Until now, the economies used to classify healthcare sector under social expenditure. However, the devastation caused by COVID 19 pandemic has upgraded public healthcare on topmost priority and core economic activity for controlling future ...

Coronavirus lockdowns to speed up long-pending revamping of supply chains

With millions of production lines impacted, business disruptions to some extent are unavoidable and the lessons learned from this turbulence will leave an everlasting impact on both global and local levels of supply chains....

COVID 19 to catalyze the redefinition of urban planning and sustainability

Until now the urban planning was focused on mitigation to natural disastrous, climate change, pollution, chronic illness and lifestyle diseases. However, the global pandemic of novel coronavirus is going to change the whole narrative of urb...

Videos

Latest News

COVID-19: Employee of Air India subsidiary tests positive

An employee of the Air Indias ground handling subsidiary has tested positive for novel coronavirus, sources said on Sunday. The female employee of the Air India Air Transport Services Ltd AIATSL has been admitted to the BMC hospital in the ...

Syria declares first coronavirus death

A woman in Syria died on Sunday of the novel coronavirus, the health ministry said, marking the countrys first officially declared death from COVID-19. The woman died as soon as she was admitted to hospital, the health ministry said in a st...

Ten people put into quarantine in Telangana

Ten People in Telangana have been put in quarantine after it was learnt that they attended a religious programme held in New Delhi. One person from Nizamabad, who also attended the same programme, has tested positive for coronavirus.Nirmal ...

Nepal extends lockdown till April 7

The Nepal government on Sunday extended the nationwide lockdown by a week till April 7 to check the spread of coronavirus which has claimed over 31,000 lives across the world so far. In a meeting at the Prime Ministers official residence in...

Give Feedback