US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. bans sales of Juul e-cigarettes, company to seek stay on enforcement; U.S. Supreme Court expands gun rights, strikes down New York law and more

The landmark court ruling and Senate action on gun safety illustrate the deep divide over firearms in the United States, weeks after mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York, killed more than 30 people, including 19 children. U.S. House speaker's husband charged with driving under influence of alcohol The husband of U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was charged on Thursday with driving under the influence of alcohol, weeks after he was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving in Napa County, California, the county's district attorney said.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 24-06-2022 18:46 IST | Created: 24-06-2022 18:26 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. bans sales of Juul e-cigarettes, company to seek stay on enforcement; U.S. Supreme Court expands gun rights, strikes down New York law and more
US Supreme Court Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

U.S. bans sales of Juul e-cigarettes, company to seek stay on enforcement

Sales of Juul e-cigarettes were blocked by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, in a major blow to the once high-flying firm whose products have been tied to a surge in teenage vaping. The agency said the applications "lacked sufficient evidence" to show that sale of the products would be appropriate for public health, following a nearly two-year-long review of data provided by the company.

U.S. Supreme Court expands gun rights, strikes down New York law

The Supreme Court on Thursday declared for the first time that the U.S. Constitution protects an individual's right to carry a handgun in public for self-defense, handing a landmark victory to gun rights advocates in a nation deeply divided over how to address firearms violence. The 6-3 ruling, with the conservative justices in the majority and liberal justices in dissent, struck down New York state's limits on carrying concealed handguns outside the home. The court found that the law, enacted in 1913, violated a person's right to "keep and bear arms" under the U.S. Constitution's Second Amendment.

Harvard must face lawsuit over 'horrific' slave photos -Massachusetts court

Massachusetts' highest court on Thursday ruled that Harvard University can be sued for mistreating a descendant of slaves who were forced to be photographed in 1850 for a study by a professor trying to prove the inferiority of Black people. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled https://tmsnrt.rs/3xH6fPa Harvard's "horrific, historic role" in creating the images meant it had a duty to respond carefully to Tamara Lanier's requests for information about them, which she said the university failed to do.

U.S. Senate passes gun safety bill as Supreme Court knocks down handgun limits

A bipartisan package of modest gun safety measures passed the U.S. Senate late on Thursday even as the Supreme Court broadly expanded gun rights by ruling Americans have a constitutional right to carry handguns in public for self-defense. The landmark court ruling and Senate action on gun safety illustrates the deep divide over firearms in the United States, weeks after mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York, killed more than 30 people, including 19 children.

U.S. House speaker's husband charged with driving under influence of alcohol

The husband of U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was charged on Thursday with driving under the influence of alcohol, weeks after he was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving in Napa County, California, the county's district attorney said. Late in May, Paul Pelosi, 82, was booked into the Napa County Detention Center. He was released from custody upon his promise to appear for an arraignment in Napa County Superior Court on August 3.

Trump allies sought pardons after supporting his attempts to overturn the election

At least five congressional Republican allies of Donald Trump sought White House pardons after supporting his attempts to overturn his 2020 election defeat, witnesses on Thursday told the U.S. House of Representatives to probe into the Jan. 6, 2021, assault on the Capitol. Their names emerged at the end of the fifth day of hearings that focused on how the then-president pressured top Justice Department officials daily in his final weeks in office to help him illegally hold onto power.

Landmark gun-safety bill heads to U.S. House after Senate passage

A gun-safety bill that marked rare bipartisan cooperation as it passed the U.S. Senate was poised for approval by the House of Representatives on Friday on its way to President Joe Biden's desk. The Senate bill, passed in a 65-33 vote late Thursday, is a modest package of measures to toughen federal gun laws, weeks after mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York, that killed more than 30 people, including 19 children. Fifteen Republicans joined all 50 Senate Democrats in voting for passage.

Texas repeatedly raises pollution limits for the Cheniere LNG plant

Cheniere, the largest U.S. exporter of liquefied natural gas, boasts that it's helping to "improve local air quality in communities globally" because the cleaner-burning fuel it ships displaces coal in power plants. But in the Corpus Christi, Texas region, where the fuel is prepared for shipment, the company is making air quality worse -with the consent of state regulators.

U.S. Supreme Court protects police from 'Miranda' lawsuits

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday shielded police from the risk of paying money damages for failing to advise criminal suspects of their rights before obtaining statements later used against them in court, siding with a Los Angeles County deputy sheriff. The justices ruled 6-3 in favor of deputy sheriff Carlos Vega, who had appealed a lower court decision reviving a lawsuit by a hospital employee named Terence Tekoh who accused the officer of violating his rights under the U.S. Constitution's Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination.

UN rights office: Findings suggest Al Jazeera journalist killed by Israeli forces

Information reviewed by the U.N. human rights office suggests Israeli security forces fired the shots that killed Palestinian-American reporter Shireen Abu Akleh in May, not indiscriminate firing from Palestinians, a spokesperson said on Friday. "It is deeply disturbing that Israeli authorities have not conducted a criminal investigation," Ravina Shamdasani told a briefing in Geneva.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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