Here's everything you need to know about last Solar Eclipse of 2021

According to NASA, Antarctica is the only place where the total solar eclipse will be visible while viewers in other regions will experience a partial solar eclipse.


Devdiscourse News Desk | California | Updated: 29-11-2021 07:51 IST | Created: 27-11-2021 21:17 IST
Here's everything you need to know about last Solar Eclipse of 2021
Representative image Image Credit: Flickr

The last Solar Eclipse of 2021 is happening next week on December 4. During a solar eclipse, the Moon gets in the way of the Sun's light and casts its shadow on Earth.

Depending on the region, people will have the chance to experience a total or partial eclipse of the Sun. During a total solar eclipse, the Sun, Moon, and Earth line up so that the Sun is blocked when viewed from within the Moon's shadow on Earth. On the other hand, a partial eclipse occurs when the Sun, Moon, and Earth are not exactly lined up.

According to NASA, Antarctica is the only place where the total solar eclipse will be visible while viewers in other regions will experience a partial solar eclipse on December 4. The upcoming partial solar eclipse will be visible in parts of Saint Helena, Namibia, Lesotho, South Africa, South Georgia and Sandwich Islands, Crozet Islands, Falkland Islands, Chile, New Zealand, and Australia.

How to safely view a solar eclipse safely?

When viewing a partial solar eclipse, NASA recommends viewers to wear solar viewing or eclipse glasses throughout the entire eclipse and avoid regular sunglasses because they are not safe for viewing the Sun even if you stack many of them together. You can get solar viewing or eclipse glasses from a camera store or online.

If you don't have solar viewing or eclipse glasses, you can use an alternate indirect method, such as a pinhole projector. However, they shouldn't be used to look directly at the Sun, but instead to project sunlight onto a surface.

How to watch the live stream?

NASA said that a view of the total solar eclipse from Union Glacier, Antarctica, will be streamed on YouTube and on nasa.gov/live. The live stream will begin at 1:30 a.m. EST and at 3:37 a.m. EST.

Give Feedback