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Lights on fishnets can save turtles, dolphins: Study

While fishnets are used to catch fishes for the seafood business. The fishnets also capture marine animals including dolphins, turtles and other sea creatures that form an indistinctive part of the flora and fauna. Given the fact, a new study suggests, placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows.


Lights on fishnets can save turtles, dolphins: Study
Representative image.. Image Credit: ANI

While fishnets are used to catch fishes for the seafood business. The fishnets also capture marine animals including dolphins, turtles and other sea creatures that form an indistinctive part of the flora and fauna. Given the fact, a new study suggests, placing lights on fishing nets reduces the chances of sea turtles and dolphins being caught by accident, new research shows. LED lights along the top of floating gillnets cut accidental 'bycatch' of sea turtles by more than 70 per cent, and that of small cetaceans (including dolphins and porpoises) by more than 66 per cent.

The study looked at small-scale vessels departing from three Peruvian ports between 2015 and 2018, and found the lights didn't reduce the amount of fish caught from 'target species' (ie what the fishers wanted to catch). The results of the study were published in the journal Biological Conservation. "Gillnet fisheries often have high bycatch rates of threatened marine species such as sea turtles, whales, dolphins, and seabirds," said lead author Alessandra Bielli, who carried out analyses as part of her master's research at the Centre for Ecology and Conservation at Exeter's Penryn Campus in Cornwall.

"This could lead to declines in the populations of these non-target species -- yet few solutions to reduce gillnet bycatch have been developed. "Sensory cues -- in this case LED lights -- are one way we might alert such species to the presence of fishing gear in the water."

The researchers placed lights every 10m along the float line of 864 gillnets, pairing each with an unlit net to compare the results. "The dramatic reduction in bycatch of sea turtles and cetaceans in illuminated nets shows how this simple, relatively low-cost technique could help these species and allow fishers to fish more sustainably. Given the success we have had, we hope other fisheries with bycatch problems will also try illuminating their fishing nets," said Exeter PhD graduate Dr Jeffrey Mangel, of Peruvian NGO ProDelphinus.

Most of the turtles caught in the study were green turtles (86 per cent), though loggerhead and olive ridley turtles were also caught. Among the small cetaceans captured, 47 per cent were long-beaked common dolphins, 26 per cent were dusky dolphins and 24 per cent were Burmeister's porpoises.

"This work has further shown the usefulness of lights on nets to save wildlife. We now need lights that are ever more robust and affordable," said Professor Brendan Godley of the University of Exeter. (ANI)

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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