Insecurity and bureaucracy hampering aid to Ethiopia’s Tigray region

Nearly three months after the start of conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, hundreds of thousands of people have yet to receive assistance, the United Nations reported on Wednesday, citing information from its humanitarian coordination agency, OCHA.

UN News | Updated: 14-01-2021 09:57 IST | Created: 14-01-2021 03:19 IST
Insecurity and bureaucracy hampering aid to Ethiopia’s Tigray region
Mr Dujarric said the UN continues to receive alarming reports of civilians being injured and killed in rural areas in Tigray, as well as of violations against civilians, though verification remains a challenge. Image Credit: ANI

"Humanitarian assistance continues to be constrained by the lack of full, and safe, unhindered access to Tigray, caused by both insecurity and bureaucratic delays", UN Spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric told journalists.

"The UN and its humanitarian partners in Ethiopia urgently call on all parties to allow the immediate safe passage of humanitarian personnel and their supplies to the Tigray Region to be able to reach all people who desperately need assistance."

Over two million in need

Mr Dujarric said the UN continues to receive alarming reports of civilians being injured and killed in rural areas in Tigray, as well as of violations against civilians, though verification remains a challenge.

"Aid workers have been able to deliver assistance in some areas, mainly in cities, where access has been granted by the authorities. However, the number of people reached is extremely low compared to the 2.3 million people we estimate are in need of life-saving assistance", he said.

The situation is particularly critical for newly displaced people and refugees, especially those who were living in two camps that remain inaccessible, according to OCHA.

Humanitarians further warn that the majority of the 270,000 people receiving benefits through the Government's Safety Net Programme have also been without assistance as banks in most rural areas have been closed since before the crisis began.

"These are extremely vulnerable people who rely on monthly cash transfers to meet their basic needs," said Mr Dujarric.

Visit UN News for more.


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Addressing conflict-related sexual violence at long last

... ...

Why unequal access to coronavirus vaccines is a threat to us all

... ...

India’s love affair with fossil fuels: the path to sustainable development?

... ...

Videos

Latest News

IT Dept claims Rs 1,000-crore black income after raids on TN jewellery, bullion group

The Income Tax Department has detected undisclosed income of over Rs 1,000 crore after it raided a leading bullion trader and south Indias biggest jewellery retailer based in election-bound Tamil Nadu, the CBDT claimed on Sunday.It did not ...

Car, gelatin sticks found near Ambani's house sent for forensic test

Mumbai Police have sent for forensic analysis the car and gelatin sticks found in it near industrialist Mukesh Ambanis residence here last month, officials said on Sunday.The Forensic Science Laboratory FSL at Kalina in Mumbai will check th...

Australian Rules-Hall of Famer Hunter to donate brain for concussion research

Former Australian Rules player Ken Hunter has said he would donate his brain to science, answering a call to players for help with medical research into chronic traumatic encephalopathy CTE and other neurodegenerative diseases. A Melbourne ...

DMK gives 25 Assembly seats, Kanyakumari LS seat to Congress

After tough negotiations that stretched for days, the DMK on Sunday allotted 25 assembly seats and the Kanyakumari Lok Sabha constituency to its key ally, the Congress.A formal pact for the April 6 Assembly election was signed by DMK presid...

Give Feedback