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Most New Zealanders experience fairly flexible work arrangements: Survey

The Survey of working life, conducted between October and December 2018, asked employed people about their work arrangements, employment conditions, and satisfaction with their job and work-life balance.


Devdiscourse News Desk Wellington
Updated: 03-07-2019 08:33 IST
Most New Zealanders experience fairly flexible work arrangements: Survey

This survey found that flexible start and finish times were one of the most common forms of flexible arrangements offered by businesses. Image Credit: ANI

Over 50 percent of employees in New Zealand have flexible work hours, allowing them to start and finish work at different times each day, and one-third have worked from home, Stats NZ said today.

The Survey of working life, conducted between October and December 2018, asked employed people about their work arrangements, employment conditions, and satisfaction with their job and work-life balance.

While the Survey of working life provides an employee perspective of flexible work, the 2018 business operations survey, looked at flexible working arrangements from an employers' perspective. This survey found that flexible start and finish times were one of the most common forms of flexible arrangements offered by businesses.

"Flexibility at work comes in different forms and can include being able to vary the hours, days, and location of work. Although most New Zealanders experience fairly flexible work arrangements, the types of flexibility people experience at work vary, depending on the industry they work in and what job they have," labour market statistics manager Scott Ussher said.

Although half of the employees have flexible work hours, more men (54 percent) than women (49 percent) have flexible hours. Parents of dependent children are more likely to have flexible hours (57 percent) than non-parents (49 percent).

The proportion of employees who have flexible work hours varies considerably by industry, ranging from over 7 in 10 employees in rental, hiring, and real estate services, to under 4 in 10 employees in healthcare and social assistance.

"It's not surprising that industries like healthcare and social assistance, and education and training have lower rates of employees working flexible hours, as these industries include professions, such as doctors, nurses, and teachers, where fixed working hours are largely unavoidable," Mr Ussher said.

There is also variation by occupation, with employees working as managers having the highest proportion of flexible work hours (67 percent), compared with the community and personal service workers, where only 37 percent are on flexible hours.

More than one-third of employees have worked from home in their main job

Men and women employees were equally likely to have worked from home, with 43 percent of men have done so, compared with 42 percent of women.

The age group where employees were most likely to have ever done some work from home was 35–39 years (47 percent), compared with employees aged 15–19 years were working from home was uncommon (6.4 percent).

Parents of dependent children were considerably more likely to have ever worked from home (44 percent), compared with non-parents (29 percent).

The proportion of employees who have been able to do some work from home in their main job varied substantially by industry, ranging from nearly 7 in 10 people in education and training, down to just over 1 in 10 people in retail trade and accommodation and food services.

There was also some variation by occupation. It was most common for professionals (58 percent) to have done some work from home, followed closely by managers (57 percent).

Unsurprisingly, the occupation where it was least likely to have done some work from home was for machinery operators and drivers (6.0 percent), followed closely by labourers (6.5 percent).

Working from home did not always correlate with increased satisfaction with work-life balance. While most employees who had done work from home were satisfied with their work-life balance (69 percent), they were more likely to be dissatisfied, or very dissatisfied (12 percent), than those who did not work from home (6.9 percent).

"So, for some people, working from home can be useful to help juggle their professional and personal life, but for others, it might intrude on their personal life and cause dissatisfaction with work-life balance," Mr Ussher said.

COUNTRY : New Zealand