Left Menu
Development News Edition

Sinovac coronavirus vaccine offered by Chinese city for emergency use costs $60

The eastern city of Jiaxin's center for disease control and prevention (CDC) said in a statement on WeChat that two doses of the vaccine candidate, called CoronaVac, will cost 200 yuan ($29.75) per dose and that vaccinations for key groups including medical professionals have begun. Chinese authorities have to date not released pricing details for potential COVID-19 vaccines.

Reuters | Beijing | Updated: 16-10-2020 12:19 IST | Created: 16-10-2020 12:16 IST
Sinovac coronavirus vaccine offered by Chinese city for emergency use costs $60
Representative picture. Image Credit: Unsplash

A Chinese city is offering Sinovac Biotech's experimental COVID-19 vaccine to essential workers and other high-risk groups as part of a national program for about $60. The eastern city of Jiaxin's center for disease control and prevention (CDC) said in a statement on WeChat that two doses of the vaccine candidate, called CoronaVac, will cost 200 yuan ($29.75) per dose and that vaccinations for key groups including medical professionals have begun.

Chinese authorities have to date not released pricing details for potential COVID-19 vaccines. Hundreds of thousands of people have been given experimental vaccines in late-stage trials as part of an emergency inoculation program launched in July. It was not clear if Jiaxin city's pricing includes subsidies. The city's CDC declined to comment.

Sinovac did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Its vaccine is in late-stage trials in Brazil, Indonesia, and Turkey, and the company has said that an interim analysis of Phase 3 trial data could come as early as November. Bio Farma, a state-owned firm in Indonesia which has reached a deal for at least 40 million doses from Sinovac, said this week the vaccine will cost around 200,000 rupiahs ($13.60) per dose when it becomes available in the Southeast Asian country.

China has said that while reasonable profits for companies are permitted, COVID-19 vaccines should be priced close to cost. China National Pharmaceutical Group (Sinopharm) said in August that a vaccine candidate developed by a unit may cost no more than 1,000 yuan ($148.80) for two shots. An official at China's National Health Commission has said, however, the price will be lower.


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Turbulence surrounding tobacco control in Ghana

... ...

Smart healthcare: IoT redefining the way healthcare is delivered

As the world is embracing the new wave of digitalization triggered by the pandemic and the arrival of 5G, the adoption of IoT devices will further boom. With adoption set to soar, IoT security issues and other challenges cant be ignored any...

Refugee compassion and response: Ideas to mitigate disasters now and in their future

Their homeland becomes a forbidden territory for them and more likely than not, their journey to foreign soil is no less traumatizing, not to say deadly. It is crucial to help refugees live a life of dignity and purpose....

Inadequate water infrastructure causes a tidal wave of coronavirus in rural Alaska

... ...

Videos

Latest News

Irresponsible "tough talk" with China is useless, says Canada foreign minister

Canada will keep pressing China to improve its human rights record but has no interest in irresponsible tough talk, Foreign Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said on Monday.Bilateral ties between the two nations effectively froze in Dece...

UN ‘extremely concerned’ for safety of Tigray civilians in regional capital, as refugee numbers grow

Due to a near total communications blackout across Tigray, establishing facts on the ground is proving difficult, but UN Spokesperson Stphane Dujarric told correspondents at UN Headquarters that more than half a million people remain in M...

U.S. holiday travelers voice dread, determination as they defy COVID-19 warnings

Millions of Americans appeared to be disregarding public health warnings and traveling ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, likely fueling an alarming surge in coronavirus infections before a series of promising new vaccines are expected to b...

Thanksgiving travelers give U.S. airports their busiest weekend since March

More than 3 million airline passengers passed through U.S. airports over the weekend, disregarding calls to avoid Thanksgiving trips and making it the busiest air-travel weekend since coronavirus lockdowns hit in mid-March. The Transportati...

Give Feedback