Left Menu
Development News Edition

UK hospital told to prepare for COVID-19 vaccine rollout by November: Report

The report claims that all other clinical trials at the unnamed famous hospital in the UK capital have been paused as all resources go toward preparing to vaccinate thousands of doctors, nurses and other frontline staff with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine as soon as it is ready. “The NHS has a tried and tested track record for delivering vaccination programmes and will work with existing partners across the healthcare system to ensure a COVID-19 vaccine can be deployed safely and effectively,” a Department of Health and Social Care statement said, without confirming or denying the latest reports.

PTI | London | Updated: 26-10-2020 20:53 IST | Created: 26-10-2020 20:30 IST
UK hospital told to prepare for COVID-19 vaccine rollout by November: Report
Representative Image Image Credit: ANI

A major London hospital trust has been told to be ready to receive the first batches of the COVID-19 vaccine being trialled by Oxford University and AstraZeneca by early next month, according to a UK media report on Monday. 'The Sun' newspaper claims that the country's state-funded National Health Service (NHS) is preparing for an initial rollout of the vaccine from the week "commencing November 2".

"The vaccine is still in testing, but a major effort has been ordered to have the world-leading hospital in London ready to go as soon as it is given the green light," the newspaper reports. The report claims that all other clinical trials at the unnamed famous hospital in the UK capital have been paused as all resources go toward preparing to vaccinate thousands of doctors, nurses and other frontline staff with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine as soon as it is ready.

"The NHS has a tried and tested track record for delivering vaccination programmes and will work with existing partners across the healthcare system to ensure a COVID-19 vaccine can be deployed safely and effectively," a Department of Health and Social Care statement said, without confirming or denying the latest reports. "A COVID-19 vaccine will only be deployed once it has been proven to be safe and effective through robust clinical trials and approved for use by the independent regulator," it said.

Last week, it had emerged that an independent analysis of the Oxford vaccine trials had found that it was doing "everything expected", raising hopes for its ability to combat the deadly virus. The vaccine, ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and also known as AZD1222, is considered among the most advanced in the worldwide hunt for a viable vaccine against the novel coronavirus. The Oxford vaccine is made by taking a common cold virus (adenovirus) from chimpanzees and deleting about 20 per cent of the virus' instructions. This means it is impossible for the vaccine to replicate or cause disease in humans, but it can still be produced in the laboratory under special conditions. By removing these genetic instructions there is space to add the instructions for the spike protein from SARS-CoV-2. Once inside a human cell, the genetic instructions for the spike protein need to be 'photocopied' many times – a process known as "transcription". In any vaccine system, it is these so-called photocopies that are directly used to make large amounts of the spike protein.

Once the spike protein is made, the immune system will react to it and this pre-trains the immune system to identify a real Covid-19 infection. So, when the person vaccinated is confronted with the SARS-CoV-2 virus their immune system is pre-trained and ready to attack it. Oxford University says that adenoviruses have been used for many years to make vaccines, and these are always tested to very high standards to make sure every batch of vaccine has the correct copy of genetic instructions embedded in the vaccine.


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

Turbulence surrounding tobacco control in Ghana

... ...

Smart healthcare: IoT redefining the way healthcare is delivered

As the world is embracing the new wave of digitalization triggered by the pandemic and the arrival of 5G, the adoption of IoT devices will further boom. With adoption set to soar, IoT security issues and other challenges cant be ignored any...

Refugee compassion and response: Ideas to mitigate disasters now and in their future

Their homeland becomes a forbidden territory for them and more likely than not, their journey to foreign soil is no less traumatizing, not to say deadly. It is crucial to help refugees live a life of dignity and purpose....

Inadequate water infrastructure causes a tidal wave of coronavirus in rural Alaska

... ...

Videos

Latest News

Home broadband market holds potential for both big, regional players: Report

Indias home broadband segment has been highly underpenetrated for years due to a weak wired infrastructure, execution woes, and high investment requirements, but Jios entry, with aggressive targets, has drawn attention of all to the opportu...

Will reconsider RLP’s support to NDA if new farm laws not withdrawn: Beniwal

Nagaur MP Hanuman Beniwal, an alliance partner of NDA, on Monday said he will have to reconsider his partys support to the Centre if the new agricultural reform laws are not withdrawn. Beniwal, the convener of Rashtriya Loktantrik Party R...

Commerce ministry for imposing anti-dumping duty on radial tyres from Thailand

The commerce ministry has recommended imposition of an anti-dumping duty on imports of a certain tye of radial tyres from Thailand, to protect domestic manufacturers from cheap inbound shipments of the product, according to a notificat...

Motorcycling-Isle of Man cancels 2021 TT races due to coronavirus

The Isle of Man has cancelled next years TT motorcycle races because of the uncertainty over the COVID-19 pandemic, the government of the British Crown Dependency said on Monday, marking the second straight year the races wont be run. The a...

Give Feedback