Devdiscourse
Development News Edition
Give Feedback
write for Us

Reuters Health News Summary


Reuters
Updated: 29-01-2019 10:29 IST
Reuters Health News Summary

Following is a summary of current health news briefs. The digital drug: Internet addiction spawns U.S. treatment programs

When Danny Reagan was 13, he began exhibiting signs of what doctors usually associate with drug addiction. He became agitated, secretive and withdrew from friends. He had quit baseball and Boy Scouts, and he stopped doing homework and showering. But he was not using drugs. He was hooked on YouTube and video games, to the point where he could do nothing else. As doctors would confirm, he was addicted to his electronics. U.S. citizen leaks data on 14,200 people in Singapore with HIV

An HIV-positive American who had been deported from Singapore after serving a jail term has leaked online the personal data of 14,200 Singaporeans and foreigners diagnosed in the city-state with the virus. The disclosure by Singapore's health ministry late Monday, coming after last year's news of a major cyber attack on its national health database, could further dent the highly wired state's push to place itself as a data and health care hub. Germany seeks medical marijuana producers for home grown supply

Germany has accepted bids for supply contracts from 79 prospective cannabis growers as the country seeks to develop its own medicinal marijuana industry and reduce reliance on imports from Canada and the Netherlands. The country's drugs regulator BfArM said on Monday it aimed to select growers between April and June, for a total cannabis procurement volume of 10,400 kg over four years. It declined to name the bidders. U.S. judge to allow controversial evidence in Roundup cancer trials

A federal judge overseeing lawsuits alleging Bayer AG's glyphosate-based Roundup weed killer causes cancer on Monday tentatively allowed pieces of controversial evidence that the company had hoped to exclude from upcoming trials. U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria during a hearing in San Francisco federal court called his decision "probably most disappointing for Monsanto," the Bayer unit that manufactures the world's most widely used herbicide. Thailand to revoke foreign patent requests on marijuana

Thailand on Monday effectively revoked all foreign patent requests for the use of marijuana, after fears foreign firms would dominate a market thrown open last month when the government approved the drug for medical use and research. The junta-appointed parliament in Thailand, a country which until the 1930s had a tradition of using marijuana to relieve pain and fatigue, voted to amend the Narcotic Act of 1979 in December in what it described as "a New Year's gift to the Thai people". Gun deaths rising among white kids as more families own handguns

Handgun ownership is on the rise among white American families with young kids, and a new study suggests this is contributing to more childhood deaths from gunshot injuries. The shift to more families with firearms having handguns in their homes "may be partially responsible for the doubling in the firearm-related mortality rate among very young children - 1- to 5-year-olds - over the past decade," said study leader Kate Prickett, director of the Roy McKenzie Centre for the Study of Families and Children at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. 'Greed' fueled Insys founder's opioid bribe scheme: prosecutor

A lawyer for Insys Therapeutics Inc's one-time billionaire founder on Monday denied that he had any role in the U.S. opioid crisis as a federal prosecutor told jurors he ran a scheme to bribe doctors to prescribe an addictive fentanyl spray. John Kapoor, the drugmaker's former chairman, and four colleagues are the first painkiller manufacturer executives to face trial over conduct authorities say contributed to an opioid abuse crisis that has killed tens of thousands of people a year. New EPA rule may hinder health research

A new rule proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may make it almost impossible to uncover hazards such as dirty air, polluted water and environmental toxins, researchers say. The rule mandates that all underlying data from studies be made available to any and all researchers in the interests of transparency. But while transparency is generally a laudable goal, the rule may be used to throw out older studies for which data is no longer available and newer studies with data that can't be shared because of patient privacy issues, said Dr. Renee Salas, the lead author on an opinion piece published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Israel's InterCure to ramp up medical cannabis production: chairman

InterCure plans to expand into 10 countries in the next two years to meet growing demand for medical marijuana, chairman Ehud Barak said on Monday. InterCure, a holding company of small medical firms, bought medical cannabis developer Canndoc in September and later hired Barak -- a former army commando and Israeli prime minister -- as chairman. Too much toddler screen time tied to worse social, motor skills by kindergarten

Toddlers who spend too much time in front of televisions, tablets, and smartphones may not become as skilled at problem-solving, communication and other skills needed for school as their peers who have less screen time, a new study suggests. Children in the study had an average of 17 hours of screen time a week when they were two years old, and 25 hours a week by the time they were three. This far exceeds one-hour daily limit recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics to allow children enough time for creative play and interactions with caregivers and peers.


POST A COMMENT