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World News Roundup: Chance of disorderly Brexit jumps; U.S. blames Iran for attack on oil tankers and more


Devdiscourse News Desk
Updated: 14-06-2019 18:32 IST
World News Roundup: Chance of disorderly Brexit jumps; U.S. blames Iran for attack on oil tankers and more

Image Credit: IANS

Following is a summary of current world news briefs.

Turkey says would retaliate against U.S. sanctions over Russian S-400s

Turkey will "take reciprocal steps" if the United States imposes sanctions over its purchase of Russian S-400 defenses, the Turkish foreign minister said on Friday, marking the latest step toward a standoff between the NATO allies. "If the United States takes any negative actions towards us, we will also take reciprocal steps," Mevlut Cavusoglu, the minister, said when asked about possible U.S. sanctions in an interview broadcast on Turkish TV.

Investigators to present latest findings on downing of MH17

International investigators looking into the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 in July 2014 said on Friday they would present their latest findings next week, nearly five years after the disaster. Family of the victims and the media will be briefed on the developments on June 19, prosecutors said in a statement.

U.S. blames Iran for attack on oil tankers, Tehran calls accusation alarming

Iran said on Friday it was alarming and wrong of the United States to blame Tehran for attacks on two oil tankers at the entrance to the Gulf, after an incident that has raised concerns about a new confrontation in the vital oil shipping route. Washington released a video that it said showed Iran's Revolutionary Guards were behind Thursday's attacks on the Norwegian-owned Front Altair and the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous near the Strait of Hormuz shipping chokepoint.

What would Churchill say? Boris Johnson needs to be braver and face media, says rival

Boris Johnson, the frontrunner to replace Theresa May as Britain's prime minister, needs to be braver and face the media, one of his main rivals said on Friday following accusations the former foreign secretary was avoiding scrutiny. Jeremy Hunt, Britain's foreign minister, said there needed to be a debate about Brexit and the leadership contenders' plans for leaving the European Union.

UK court sets Assange U.S. extradition hearing for February 2020

The full extradition hearing to decide whether Wikileaks founder Julian Assange should be sent to the United States to face accusations including spying charges will take place in February next year, a London court ruled on Friday. Assange, 47, faces 18 counts in the U.S. including conspiring to hack government computers and violating an espionage law. He could spend decades in prison if convicted.

Special Report: They fled Venezuela's crisis by boat - then vanished

A taxi dropped Maroly Bastardo and her two small children by a cemetery not far from the shore in northeast Venezuela. She still had time to change her mind. Eight months pregnant, Bastardo faced forbidding choices in a nation whose economy has collapsed. Give birth in Venezuela, where newborns are dying at alarming rates in shortage-plagued maternity wards. Or board a crowded smuggler's boat bound for Trinidad, the largest of two islands that make up the Caribbean nation of Trinidad and Tobago. Her husband, Kennier Berra, had landed there in February, found work and beckoned her to join him.

Chance of disorderly Brexit jumps; eventual free trade deal still likely: Poll

The likelihood Britain and the European Union part ways without a deal has jumped in the past month, according to economists in a Reuters poll, as most candidates jockeying to take over as prime minister appear to have adopted a hard line stance. Three years on since Britons voted to leave the EU, there is still little clarity as to how, when or even if the two sides will draw a line under Britain's four-decades of membership.

Support wavers in Hong Kong for bill allowing extraditions to China after protests

Cracks appeared to emerge on Friday in the support base for a proposed Hong Kong law that would allow extraditions to China as opponents of the bill vowed further demonstrations after hundreds of thousands took to the streets this week. The extradition bill, which will cover Hong Kong residents and foreign and Chinese nationals living or traveling in the city, has many concerned it may threaten the rule of law that underpins Hong Kong's international financial status. Iran's Rouhani says Middle East situation calls for closer ties with Russia: RIA

The Middle East situation requires closer ties between Iran and Russia, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said at a China-led security bloc summit on Friday, according to the Russian state news agency RIA. Rouhani earlier said U.S. actions pose a serious threat to stability in the Middle East after Washington accused Iran of attacks on oil tankers on a key shipping route.

Exclusive: Hong Kong police "trapped in the middle" by polarizing extradition bill

Several senior Hong Kong police officials feel caught between a rock and a hard place as city leader Carrie Lam tries to ram through contentious extradition laws that have triggered violent clashes between police and protesters. Police fired tear gas, bean bag rounds and rubber bullets at young protesters who gathered this week around the Chinese-ruled city's legislature and government headquarters in the tens of thousands.

(With inputs from agencies.)


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