World News Roundup: Japan finds another Moderna vial suspected to contain foreign substance; Taliban says it has surrounded Afghan resistance fighters, calls for peace and more

The Islamist militia focused on keeping banks, hospitals and government machinery running after the final withdrawal of U.S. forces on Monday brought an end to a huge airlift of Afghans who had helped Western nations during the 20-year war. Russia's Putin says U.S. Afghan foray achieved nothing but tragedy Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that the U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan had achieved nothing but tragedy and loss of life on all sides and showed it was impossible to foist foreign values on other nations.


Reuters | Updated: 01-09-2021 18:50 IST | Created: 01-09-2021 18:29 IST
World News Roundup: Japan finds another Moderna vial suspected to contain foreign substance; Taliban says it has surrounded Afghan resistance fighters, calls for peace and more
Representative image Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current world news briefs.

Japan finds another Moderna vial suspected to contain a foreign substance

Japan reported a fresh contamination case involving Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, the fourth such incident in less than a week, threatening to slow the country's sputtering inoculation campaign. Kanagawa prefecture said on Tuesday several black particles in one Moderna vaccine vial were found upon checking for foreign substances before its use, and it has put the rest of the lot on hold.

Taliban says it has surrounded Afghan resistance fighters, calls for peace

The Taliban has surrounded the only remaining province resisting its rule, a senior leader said on Wednesday, calling on rebels to negotiate a settlement with the group. Since the fall of Kabul on Aug. 15, mountainous Panjshir has been the only province to hold out against the Islamist group, although there has also been fighting in neighboring Baghlan province between Taliban and local militia forces.

The new era for Afghanistan starts with long queues, rising prices

As Kabul began a new era of Taliban rule, long queues outside banks and soaring prices in the bazaars underlined the everyday worries now facing its population after the spectacular seizure of the city two weeks ago. For the Taliban, growing economic hardship is emerging as their biggest challenge, with a sinking currency and rising inflation adding misery to a country where more than a third of the population lives on less than $2 a day.

Biden to pledge security aid in first meeting with Ukraine's Zelenskiy

President Joe Biden meets with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy on Wednesday and a U.S official said he will offer strong support for Ukraine's sovereignty against Russian aggression coupled with a promise to deliver $60 million in security aid. The two leaders, at their first face-to-face meeting since Biden took office in January, are expected to discuss their differences over the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, which Ukraine fears could be used by Russia as a geopolitical weapon, among other issues.

Israel opposes U.S. plan to reopen Jerusalem embassy as 'destabilising'

Israel said on Wednesday that a U.S. plan to reopen its consulate in Jerusalem that has traditionally been a base for diplomatic outreach to Palestinians is a "bad idea" and could destabilize Prime Minister Naftali Bennett's new government. The prior administration of President Donald Trump signaled support for Israel's claim on Jerusalem as its capital by moving the U.S. embassy there from Tel Aviv and subsuming the consulate in that mission.

With Kabul airport closed, fearful Afghans rush for the border

Thousands of people trying to flee Afghanistan rushed to its borders on Wednesday as an administrative vacuum after the Taliban's takeover left foreign donors unsure of how to respond to a looming humanitarian crisis. The Islamist militia focused on keeping banks, hospitals and government machinery running after the final withdrawal of U.S. forces on Monday brought an end to a huge airlift of Afghans who had helped Western nations during the 20-year war.

Russia's Putin says U.S. Afghan foray achieved nothing but tragedy

Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that the U.S. military intervention in Afghanistan had achieved nothing but tragedy and loss of life on all sides and showed it was impossible to foist foreign values on other nations. Speaking to teenagers at an educational facility in the Russian far east, Putin made clear that he deemed the U.S. approach to a country once invaded by the Soviet Union to have been deeply flawed.

Canada's 'infernal summer' puts climate change at forefront of election

Canadians are demanding decisive action from leaders to tackle climate change after a summer of extreme weather intensified environmental concerns, making it the No. 1 issue in September's snap election, polling data shows. For many Canadians, 2021 is the year the climate crisis hit home. A "heat dome" scorched Canada's westernmost province of British Columbia in June, smashing national temperature records, contributing to more than 500 deaths, and heralding the start of the province's third-worst wildfire season.

Rescue boat keeps migrant plight in spotlight as Mediterranean arrivals soar

A wooden dinghy carrying 19 African migrants is so heavily laden it is almost taking in water over its sides in the open sea off the Italian island of Lampedusa. The two babies onboard are crying. The dinghy, stuck in the Mediterranean with its outboard engine apparently broken, is just one of the boats helped by volunteers from the Spanish charity Proactiva Open Arms in the past days amid a surge in arrivals to Lampedusa.

Analysis: Afghanistan pullout spurs EU to revive rapid reaction force

The chaotic withdrawal of Western forces from Afghanistan has shown that the European Union needs to intervene militarily in a crisis without relying on U.S. troops, senior EU officials say. Two decades after EU leaders first agreed to set up a 50,000-60,000-strong force but failed to make it operational, EU states are once again aiming to create a 5,000-strong "first entry force". They want a deal on its design by March 2022.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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