US Domestic News Roundup: 'No SALT no deal': Democrats vow to block Build Back Better bill without tax break; U.S. Supreme Court to weigh limits on its own Oklahoma tribal ruling and more

The federal government has tens of millions of tests on hand and started sending them on Thursday, White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Jeffrey Zients told reporters at a briefing, adding the administration would release more data next week. U.S. Supreme Court to weigh limits on its own Oklahoma tribal ruling The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to consider limiting the scope of its own 2020 ruling that greatly expanded Native American tribal authority in Oklahoma in a case involving a man convicted of child neglect.


Reuters | Updated: 23-01-2022 18:41 IST | Created: 23-01-2022 18:32 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: 'No SALT no deal': Democrats vow to block Build Back Better bill without tax break; U.S. Supreme Court to weigh limits on its own Oklahoma tribal ruling and more
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Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

'No SALT no deal': Democrats vow to block Build Back Better bill without tax break

Several U.S. House members from President Joe Biden's Democratic Party are threatening to block a renewed push for his Build Back Better spending bill if it does not include the expansion of a federal deduction for taxes paid to states and local entities. Expanding the deduction, known as SALT for State and Local Taxes, has been a demand of lawmakers in higher-tax states such as California, New Jersey and New York, especially in suburbs where Democrats seek to retain control in Nov. 8 elections.

U.S. Supreme Court to weigh limits on its own Oklahoma tribal ruling

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to consider limiting the scope of its own 2020 ruling that greatly expanded Native American tribal authority in Oklahoma in a case involving a man convicted of child neglect. The justices took up the state's appeal in a case involving a man named Victor Castro-Huerta, a non-Native American whose crime was committed against a Native American child on the Cherokee Nation reservation. A state court threw out his conviction, saying the Supreme Court's 2020 ruling deprived Oklahoma authorities of jurisdiction in Castro-Huerta's case.

Arizona Democratic Party formally censures Sinema

The executive committee of the Arizona Democratic Party (ADP) formally censured U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema over her vote against changing rules in the chamber to steer through voting rights legislation, the state party said on Saturday. Sinema was one of two Democratic senators who joined with Republicans to vote against lowering the Senate's 60-vote threshold to 50 so that the Senate could pass voting rights bill without bipartisan support.

U.S. charges Texas man for threatening Georgia election officials

The U.S. Justice Department on Friday announced it has charged a Texas man with making violent threats against Georgia election and government officials. The indictment marked the first case brought by a federal task force formed in response to a wave of intimidation that has engulfed election administrators since the 2020 presidential vote. The matter is one of "dozens" of such cases under federal investigation, said Kenneth A. Polite Jr., the assistant attorney general for the department's criminal division.

Ex-Giuliani associate Fruman sentenced to one year in prison in campaign finance case

Igor Fruman, who helped Donald Trump's former personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani collect damaging information about Joe Biden before he was elected president, was sentenced on Friday to one year in prison for violating campaign finance law. In handing down the sentence of 12 months and one day, U.S. District Judge Paul Oetken said Fruman's solicitation of money from a Russian businessman to donate to U.S. political campaigns was serious because it "undermines democracy," but that the Belarus-born businessman was unlikely to commit a similar offense again.

Sarah Palin set to battle New York Times at defamation trial

Sarah Palin, the former Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee, has spent 4-1/2 years battling the New York Times over an editorial she said falsely linked her to a deadly Arizona mass shooting that left a U.S. congresswoman seriously wounded. On Monday, Palin is poised to try to begin convincing jurors in a lawsuit in Manhattan federal court that the newspaper and its former editorial page editor James Bennet defamed her.

California wildfire triggers evacuations, closes highway

A 1,500-acre fire near the coastal community of Big Sur, California triggered evacuations and closed part of a major highway, state and local officials said on Saturday. The Colorado Fire, which has been active since Friday, was 5% contained, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) said.

US starts shipping free COVID tests amid Omicron -White House

The U.S. Postal Service has begun shipping free at-home rapid COVID-19 tests after millions of orders were placed through a new federal website launched this week, the White House said on Friday as the rise in Omicron-related cases shifted nationwide. The federal government has tens of millions of tests on hand and started sending them on Thursday, White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Jeffrey Zients told reporters at a briefing, adding the administration would release more data next week.

'Our city against the killers,' New York mayor says after policeman killed

One New York City police officer was killed and another was fighting for his life after the pair were shot Friday while responding to a domestic violence call, authorities said. Neither of the officers have been identified by police. Authorities said that the policeman who died was a 22-year-old rookie officer.

Anti-abortion activists march in Washington, hoping it's the last time under Roe v. Wade

Tens of thousands of anti-abortion advocates gathered in Washington on Friday for the annual "March for Life," their mood boosted by the possibility that the U.S. Supreme Court could soon upend the Roe v. Wade ruling that legalized abortion nationwide. Despite freezing temperatures, the activists -- many attending with their school and church groups from around the country -- assembled on the National Mall carrying signs that read "I am the post-Roe generation" and "The future is anti-abortion."

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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