Left Menu
Development News Edition

Cricket-India's Iyer backs bowlers to come good, avoid series sweep

Australia have looked to target him with short-pitched bowling with close-in fielders around him and Iyer is relishing the challenge. "I definitely know that they've planned against me, so I'm really happy at least they're coming up with a plan to get me out," he said.

Reuters | Updated: 01-12-2020 16:22 IST | Created: 01-12-2020 16:22 IST
Cricket-India's Iyer backs bowlers to come good, avoid series sweep

Batsman Shreyas Iyer backed the India's bowlers to come good in Wednesday's third and final one-day international against Australia in Canberra in the touring side's bid to avoid a series sweep. Australia handsomely beat India in the first two matches of the 50-over format in Sydney, bagging the three-match series with a game to spare.

The hosts' batsmen posted 374-6 in the first ODI and put the Indian bowlers to the sword once again in the second, amassing 389-4 to set up comfortable victories. "If you see the amount of workload they have gone through in the IPL (Indian Premier League) playing continuous 14 games and after that coming here, staying in quarantine so definitely plays in your mind," Iyer told reporters on Tuesday.

"And it plays with every individual in the team, not just the bowlers. I'm sure they are world-class bowlers and with the mindset they have, they will definitely come back stronger in the next game. "I really believe in them and the coaches who have been working with them."

India's batsmen have relatively fared better, racking up 300-plus totals in both their chases and Iyer said the team were look at the positives from the two defeats. "Obviously, the bowling wasn't up to the mark but I'm sure that the bowlers are really positive with their work ethics... we are very much determined to go out there and win the next game and see to it that we don't have a clean sweep," Iyer said.

The 25-year-old got into an awkward position while facing a short delivery in the opening match to get out for two but looked better during his knock of 38 in the second. Australia have looked to target him with short-pitched bowling with close-in fielders around him and Iyer is relishing the challenge.

"I definitely know that they've planned against me, so I'm really happy at least they're coming up with a plan to get me out," he said. "I feel very overwhelmed and I take it as a challenge because I thrive under pressure. It really motivates me to go against them."

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

China: A savior for emerging markets or a poison pill?

... ...

Future of Urban Planning: Artificial Intelligence guiding the way

Advances in emerging technologies like Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning can help us understand our cities better and derive useful insights from real-time data collected through automated models....

Videos

Latest News

UK to announce hotel quarantine for Britons returning from 30 high-risk countries -Times

The British government will on Wednesday announce plans for limited hotel quarantine for Britons returning from 30 high-risk countries covered by a travel ban, the Times reported on Wednesday.These countries include South America, Portugal,...

Democrats may move forward on coronavirus aid without Republicans, says Schumer

Democrats in the U.S. Senate will move forward on U.S. President Joe Bidens coronavirus relief plan without Republican support if necessary, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday.Biden has made addressing the COVID-19 pande...

Yellen, Rice tout economics as key to fixing American inequality

Dismantling racial inequalities that have plagued the United States since its founding will boost economic growth and create new jobs for everyone, top advisers to President Joe Biden said Tuesday, laying out a central tenet of the new admi...

Dry ice, containers and overworked doctors: the hurdles for Japan's vaccine roll-out

Japans vaccination roll-out faces logistical hurdles that could further delay the slow-moving campaign, experts and officials say, complicating plans to deliver widescale coronavirus inoculations in time for the Olympics.Already the last ma...

Give Feedback