Science News Roundup: Fossilised flying reptile, cousin of dinosaur, found on Scottish beach; Russian cosmonaut sets record for most time in space - more than 878 days and mre

Kononenko is expected to reach a total of 1,000 days in space on June 5 and by late September he will have clocked 1,110 days. Fossilised flying reptile, cousin of dinosaur, found on Scottish beach The fossil remains of a species of flying reptile considered a close cousin of the dinosaur and believed to have roamed the earth tens of millions of years ago has been discovered on a beach on Scotland's Isle of Skye, scientists said on Tuesday.


Devdiscourse News desk | Updated: 07-02-2024 10:37 IST | Created: 07-02-2024 10:30 IST
Science News Roundup: Fossilised flying reptile, cousin of dinosaur, found on Scottish beach; Russian cosmonaut sets record for most time in space - more than 878 days and mre
Representative Image Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current science news briefs.

Plans to ship human ashes, drink container to Moon spark legal debate

An array of unconventional, privately funded plans to exploit the moon, including as a site for human ashes and sports-drink containers, has gathered steam in recent years as NASA pushes to make Earth's natural satellite more accessible. Concerns about possible gaps in U.S. oversight and legal questions about proper use of the moon have rocketed to the forefront.

Russian cosmonaut sets record for most time in space - more than 878 days

Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko on Sunday set a world record for total time spent in space, surpassing his compatriot Gennady Padalka who logged more than 878 days in orbit, Russia's space corporation said. At 0830 GMT Kononenko broke the record, Roscosmos said. Kononenko is expected to reach a total of 1,000 days in space on June 5 and by late September he will have clocked 1,110 days.

Fossilised flying reptile, cousin of dinosaur, found on Scottish beach

The fossil remains of a species of flying reptile considered a close cousin of the dinosaur and believed to have roamed the earth tens of millions of years ago has been discovered on a beach on Scotland's Isle of Skye, scientists said on Tuesday. The remains, found partially exposed on a large boulder, consist of a partial skeleton, including parts of the shoulders, wings, legs and backbone, an academic paper on the discovery showed.

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