Health News Roundup: U.S. Supreme Court declines to block Texas abortion ban; New Zealand says fall in COVID-19 cases shows Delta lockdown working and more

With populations ageing, the number of sufferers is projected to rise to 78 million by 2030 and 139 million by 2050, the WHO said in a report. Kosovo to destroy 133,000 AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines The Kosovo government decided to destroy 133,000 AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines over their expired date of use as the country faces a sharp rise in the coronavirus death rate.


Reuters | Updated: 02-09-2021 18:53 IST | Created: 02-09-2021 18:27 IST
Health News Roundup: U.S. Supreme Court declines to block Texas abortion ban; New Zealand says fall in COVID-19 cases shows Delta lockdown working and more
Representative image Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

U.S. Supreme Court declines to block Texas abortion ban

The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Wednesday to block a Texas ban on abortion after six weeks of pregnancy, dealing a major blow to abortion rights by leaving in place a state law that prohibits the vast majority of abortions. The decision is a major milestone in the fight over abortion, as opponents have sought for decades to roll back access to the procedure.

New Zealand says fall in COVID-19 cases shows Delta lockdown working

New Zealand reported a drop in new COVID-19 infections on Thursday, which authorities said was a sign that a nationwide lockdown was helping to limit the spread of the infectious Delta variant. Barring a few cases in February, New Zealand had been largely free of coronavirus until the Delta outbreak prompted Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to order the snap lockdown last month.

Number of people with dementia set to jump 40% to 78 million by 2030 -WHO

More than 55 million people worldwide are living with dementia, a neurological disorder that robs them of their memory and costs the world $1.3 trillion a year, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday. The progressive condition can be caused by stroke, brain injury or Alzheimer's disease. With populations aging, the number of sufferers is projected to rise to 78 million by 2030 and 139 million by 2050, the WHO said in a report.

Kosovo to destroy 133,000 AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines

The Kosovo government decided to destroy 133,000 AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines over their expired date of use as the country faces a sharp rise in the coronavirus death rate. The vaccines that will be destroyed were part of a donation from Norway with August 31 seen as an expiration date.

Australian doctors warn of risks to hospitals once COVID-19 curbs ease

Australian doctors on Thursday warned the country's hospitals are not ready to cope with the government's reopening plans, even with higher vaccination rates, as some states prepare to move from a virus suppression strategy to living with COVID-19. The Australian Medical Association (AMA) said the health system was in danger of being locked into a "permanent cycle of crisis" and has called for new modelling to check if staffing levels in hospitals can withstand an expected surge in cases when lockdown rules ease.

Facemasks and sanitizer as French kids go back to school

Twelve million French children returned to school on Thursday, wearing facemasks, using sanitizer as they arrived and standing distanced from each other in schoolyards under strict rules aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19. President Emmanuel Macron, who visited a school in the southern port city of Marseille, urged pupils to respect the regulations, saying in a Twitter video that the government was "doing what is necessary to make 'back to school' as normal as possible".

Thailand cites positive results from Sinovac-AstraZeneca vaccine formula

Thailand's health ministry said on Thursday that its COVID-19 vaccine regimen of China's Sinovac followed by British-developed AstraZeneca was safe and successfully boosted immunity among its first 1.5 million recipients. Thailand in July became the first country in the world to mix a Chinese vaccine and a Western-developed vaccine as cases and deaths in the country surged and the government struggled with vaccine supplies.

India's interests come before vaccine exports, says health ministry

India would resume exports of COVID-19 vaccines only after its own interests are taken care of, a health ministry official said on Thursday, as a recent surge in immunizations raised hopes of foreign sales that have been barred since mid-April. "Every country works with an aim of keeping its people, economy, and social system safe," Rajesh Bhushan told a weekly news conference.

South African train brings COVID-19 vaccines closer to people

At Springs train station in South Africa's biggest city Johannesburg, Simphiwe Dyantyi and her partner wait their turn to board. But they are not going anywhere, instead, they are getting COVID-19 jabs inside a stationary train. The initiative by South African state logistics firm Transnet is meant to bring vaccines closer to people and save them from traveling long distances as the government ramps up its COVID-19 vaccination drive.

Analysis: Texas abortion ban opens up 'Wild West' of enforcement, critics say

Texas's strict new abortion ban hands over the power of enforcement to private citizens - and offers them cash payments to do so - a unique construction that makes the law harder to block in court. That structure has alarmed both abortion providers, who said they feel like they now have prices on their heads and legal experts who said citizen enforcement could have broad repercussions if it was used across the United States to address other contentious social issues.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Give Feedback