Left Menu
Development News Edition

UPDATE 4-Purdue Pharma reaches tentative opioid settlement -sources

Reuters | Washington DC | Updated: 12-09-2019 01:34 IST | Created: 12-09-2019 01:31 IST
UPDATE 4-Purdue Pharma reaches tentative opioid settlement -sources
Image Credit: Flickr

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma LP reached a tentative agreement with some plaintiffs to resolve widespread litigation over its alleged role in fueling the U.S. opioid crisis and plans to tussle with states opposing its settlement offer in bankruptcy proceedings starting as soon as next week, people familiar with the matter said. On Wednesday, lead lawyers representing more than 2,000 cities, counties and other plaintiffs suing Purdue, along with 23 states and three U.S. territories, were on board with an offer from the company and its controlling Sackler family to settle lawsuits in a deal valued at up to $12 billion, the people said.

More than a dozen other states remain opposed or uncommitted to the deal, setting the stage for a legal battle over Purdue's efforts to contain the litigation in bankruptcy court, they said. States on Wednesday updated a federal judge on the settlement offer's support, which could evolve as the day progresses, the people said.

Purdue's board is scheduled to be briefed on settlement progress on Thursday, one of the people said. There remained a chance negotiations could fall apart and the company's plans, including timing of a bankruptcy filing, could change, the person said. Reuters earlier on Wednesday reported that Purdue was nearing a settlement with cities and many states.

The Sacklers, well-known wealthy philanthropists, have declined to revise their proposed settlement contribution of $3 billion over seven years and another $1.5 billion or more through the eventual sale of another business they own called Mundipharma, several people familiar with the matter said. New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut, where privately-held Purdue is based, are among the states opposed to the current offer and have pushed the family to guarantee $4.5 billion, the people said.

Last weekend, the Sacklers "refused to budge" after attorneys general in North Carolina and Tennessee presented the family with counterproposals they said had widespread support from other states, according to correspondence reviewed by Reuters. The lawsuits, which in some cases targeted the Sacklers as well as Purdue, claim the family and company contributed to a public health crisis that claimed the lives of nearly 400,000 people between 1999 and 2017, according to the latest data from U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The suits allege Purdue aggressively marketed prescription painkillers while misleading doctors and patients about their addiction and overdose risks. Purdue and the Sacklers have denied the allegations.

FAMILY CONTRIBUTION A STICKING POINT

With negotiations over the family's contribution to a settlement at loggerheads, Purdue is preparing to file for bankruptcy protection as soon as this weekend or next with the outlines of a settlement in hand, albeit one lacking support from many states, the people said. Purdue would then ask a U.S. bankruptcy judge to halt litigation while settlement discussions continue, a move some states said they are likely to challenge. A bankruptcy judge could force holdouts to accept a settlement as part of Purdue's reorganization plan if enough other plaintiffs agree.

"Purdue Pharma continues to work with all plaintiffs on reaching a comprehensive resolution to its opioid litigation that will deliver billions of dollars and vital opioid overdose rescue medicines to communities across the country impacted by the opioid crisis," the company said in a statement. Members of the Sackler family targeted in lawsuits said in a statement that they support "working toward a global resolution that directs resources to the patients, families and communities across the country who are suffering and need assistance" as opposed to engaging in what they described as "endless litigation."

With Purdue facing more than 2,000 opioid-related lawsuits, Reuters reported in March that the company and the Sacklers began exploring bankruptcy options to halt litigation and attempt to reach a far-reaching settlement. One reason Purdue is eyeing a bankruptcy filing soon is to avoid an Oct. 21 trial, the people said. That trial, stemming from widespread lawsuits consolidated in an Ohio federal court, risks a verdict with outsize damages Purdue could not withstand, one of the people said.

Purdue's current proposal envisions it using bankruptcy proceedings to transform into a public trust with a board selected by court-appointed trustees, the people said. The trust would donate drugs the company developed to combat overdoses and addiction to U.S. communities, which Purdue values at $4.45 billion over 10 years. The Sacklers, who amassed a multibillion-dollar fortune from OxyContin sales, would cede control of Purdue, they said.

A Chapter 11 filing with a deal many states oppose risks triggering more litigation and longer, more expensive bankruptcy proceedings that could reduce payouts to plaintiffs unless a broader deal is reached. "I remain steadfast in my view that the Sacklers have to give back the money they took from selling opioids so that we can put it toward solving the problem they created," Connecticut Attorney General William Tong said in a statement. "The current proposal does not do that."

The Sacklers have rebuffed requests from some plaintiffs for more details on the family's finances, some of the people said. North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein said he was preparing to follow other state officials and sue the Sacklers.

"A large number of states are committed to the notion that the Sacklers need to guarantee more money," he said, adding that different states "have different views, as is to be expected."


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

International Day of Non-Violence: Rising crimes against animals call for 'Ahimsa' redux

2020 has seen some of the most horrific incidents of animal-directed violence in India. The only silver lining - if you will - is the wave of backlash that not only sparked awareness for the prevention of animal cruelty, but also a sensibil...

South Africa's COVID-19 response: Surprising outcomes or just poor data management?

South Africa has been committed to improving its health information system and shows that a robust digital has considerable scope to improve healthcare for the entire population. But the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted that significant ga...

Post-COVID-19 Nigeria needs a robust Health Management Information System to handle high disease burden

Nigeria is among a few countries that conceptualised a health management information system HMIS in the early 90s but implementation has been a challenge till date. Besides COVID-19, the country has a huge burden of communicable and non-com...

Morocco COVID-19 response: A fragile health system and the deteriorating situation

Learning from its European neighbors, Morocco imposed drastic measures from the initial stages of the COVID-19 outbreak to try to contain its spread. The strategy worked for a few months but the cases have surged after mid-June. In this sit...

Videos

Latest News

Pak exploiting death of 11 Pakistani Hindu migrants to further anti-India propaganda: MEA

The Pakistani establishment is exploiting the death of 11 migrant Hindus from that country in India to further its anti-India propaganda and a staged protest was held in Islamabad recently by people who claimed to belong to the Hindu commun...

Cycling-Trek-Segafredo suspend Simmons after controversial tweet

Trek-Segafredo have suspended junior world champion Quinn Simmons after he made divisive, incendiary, and detrimental statements online, the WorldTour team said.The 19-year-old Americans response to a tweet about U.S. President Donald Trump...

HHS says Gilead, distributor can directly sell COVID-19 drug in U.S.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services HHS said on Thursday that U.S. hospitals can now buy Gilead Sciences Incs antiviral COVID-19 drug remdesivir from the company and its distributor. The drug, branded as Veklury, was being dist...

Mumbai Indians beat KXIP by 48 runs in IPL

Mumbai Indians dished out a splendid allround performance to outplay Kings XI Punjab by 48 runs in their Indian Premier League IPL match here on Thursday. Put in to bat, skipper Rohit Sharma smashed a 45-ball 70 at the top, while Kieron Pol...

Give Feedback