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SDG 3.7: Mother, Not Patient!

SDG 3.7: Mother, Not Patient!
Mother, Not Patient! Image Credit: Devdiscourse

The age-old adage – As Mother as Child – is now being vindicated in scientific researches throughout the world. There are various researches to suggest that the positive thinking and positive ambience are boons for the mother's health and holistic development of the fetus while negative thinking and tension cause adverse effects. Besides, the communities throughout the globe have inherited various cultural practices to promote positive thinking and pleasant ambience for 'To Be Mothers' since the day of the 'good news'.

However, the gradual deterioration in the ambience of positive thinking caused by urbanization, nuclear families and modern lifestyle adversely affect the health and well-being of pregnant women. These along with profiteering among healthcare professionals are leading to an alarming rise in cesarean deliveries which are destroying the health of 'To Be Mothers' and future generations. The mistreatment of pregnant women starts from the day they are registered as 'patient' as thereafter they are treated as patient till delivery including verbal and physical abuse in the labour room. Besides posing direct hurdles in achieving SDG 3.7 and SDG 5.6 adopted by the United Nations for 2030, these inhuman practices also, create obstacles for other SDGs closely linked with the holistic well-being of women.

Devdiscourse firmly believes that the sufferings of the 'To Be Mothers' could be minimized and happiness increased in their lives through positive discourse and sensitization of various stakeholders associated with maternal healthcare. In pursuance to its responsibility as a global media platform, Devdiscourse in association with Bhagat Phool Singh Mahila Vishwavidlaya, premiere women university in India, launched a global communication campaign – Mother, Not Patient! - at 2 pm on Tuesday, 15th October 2019 with a vision to minimise sufferings of 'To Be Mothers' and increase happiness in their lives.

The Live Discourse – SDG 3.7: Mother, Not Patient! is part of the campaign for catalyzing objective discourse. Here you can participate by posting comments, pictures, cartoons, sketches and videos etc. Besides, you can also send us news and contributions in the form of articles, blogs, researches and memoirs. After required editorial review, they will be published on Devdiscourse and also on Live Discourse.

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SDG 3.7: Mother, Not Patient! - Gigi Hadid claps back at claim she's 'disguising' her baby bump

India | Devdiscourse News Desk
Updated: 06-07-2020 15:09 IST Created: 15-10-2019 06:54 IST

3:09 PM American supermodel Gigi Hadid recently called out a publication for posting an article that suggested she's been "disguising" her growing baby bump with her fashion choices. According to E!News, earlier this week, British Vogue published a story about Hadid's pregnancy. The outlet explained that during an Instagram Live, the 25-year-old model answered a fan's question about not having "a tummy."Hadid answered, "This angle and the really baggy jumpsuit make for an optical illusion. From the side, it's a different story!" However, Hadid cleared the air and clapped back at the publication for its misleading headline."Disguise....," she began her caption on Twitter, which was directly in response to British Vogue's post on the social media platform. "I said in a baggy jumpsuit the front and side views are visually different stories - not that that was intentional or I was trying to hide anything. Will be proud and happy to share 'insight' when I feel like it, thanks." "For now I am proudly experiencing and sharing this time with my family and loved ones," she added.While rumors are doing the rounds that Hadid would be having a girl and expecting her first child with boyfriend Zayn Malik, she has kept details of her little one to herself. She did confirm the news of the baby in April during a virtual appearance on late-night TV show host Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show'."Obviously, we wished we could have announced it on our own terms but we're very excited and happy and grateful for everyone's well wishes and support," she told the late-night host at the time. "Especially during this time... it's a nice silver lining to be able to be home and be together and really experience it day by day," added the supermodel. (ANI)

11:01 PM Several thousand people rallied in Black Lives Matter protests across Australia over the weekend to call for racial equality and highlight deaths of Indigenous people while in police custody. About 500 people protested Sunday in Newcastle, north of Sydney, after the New South Wales state Supreme Court approved the rally following an attempt by police to have it banned.A rally in Sydney on Sunday began with a ceremony at which people mourned the Indigenous Australians who have died in police custody. There have been more than 400 Indigenous deaths in custody since a royal commission into the issue ended in 1991. No convictions have been recorded in any of the deaths.“We went through the lawful process, we sat through that process of the coronial inquiry, we listened to that process and we received no justice from that process," Sydney rally organiser Paul Silva told SBS Television. “This is our process to demand justice." On Saturday, Australians took part in Black Lives Matter rallies in the cities of Brisbane, Darwin, Perth and Adelaide. Many of the protesters work masks and attempted to maintain social distancing due to coronavirus concerns. Australia's Indigenous people are the most disadvantaged ethnic minority in the country. They have higher-than-average rates of infant mortality and poor health, as well as shorter life expectancy and lower levels of education and employment than other Australians.

0:58 PM According to an international team of researchers, women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease and heart failure in later life. Between 1-6 percent of all pregnancies in Western countries are affected by high blood pressure, which usually returns to normal after giving birth.This condition is known as gestational hypertension or pregnancy-induced hypertension. Clinicians increasingly recognize that women who have had gestational hypertension are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease in later life. However, studies of different kinds of cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease and heart failure, have found mixed results.To examine these links further, an international team of researchers conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 21 studies involving a total of 3.6 million women, 128,000 of who previously had gestational hypertension. This type of study is a way of combining data from all existing relevant studies, allowing researchers to compare and consolidate results from often-contradictory studies to reach more robust conclusions.The results are published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers found that women who experienced high blood pressure during their first pregnancy were at a 45 percent higher risk of overall cardiovascular disease and 46 percent higher risk of coronary heart disease compared to women who did not have high blood pressure in pregnancy.Women with one or more pregnancies affected by high blood pressure were at 81 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease, 83 percent higher risk of coronary heart disease, and 77 percent higher risk of heart failure. "When we looked at all the available research, the answer was clear: women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy even when it doesn't develop into pre-eclampsia - are more likely to develop several different kinds of cardiovascular disease," said senior author Dr. Clare Oliver-Williams from the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge.The study adds to growing evidence of the relationship between pregnancy and subsequent risk of cardiovascular events. Recurrent miscarriages, preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and pre-eclampsia have all previously been linked with a greater risk of heart disease. The researchers say it is not entirely clear why gestational hypertension is associated with heart disease in later life. However, they suggest it may be that high blood pressure in pregnancy causes lasting damage that contributes to cardiovascular disease.Alternatively, women who develop gestational hypertension may have a pre-existing susceptibility to cardiovascular disease that is revealed due to the large demands that pregnancy places upon women's bodies. Dr. Oliver-Williams said: "It is important that women know that it is not their fault that they developed high blood pressure in pregnancy and developing heart disease is not a foregone conclusion. Women who have experienced gestational hypertension may have been dealt a tough hand, but it is how they play those cards that matters the most.""Small positive changes can really help. They can be as simple as eating more fruit and vegetables, small bouts of regular exercise, and finding time to unwind if that is possible with kids around," Dr. Williams added.

4:52 PM "Mothers may worry that if they've been depressed during pregnancy then it's too late to do anything about it, but reducing depressive symptoms at any stage is better for them and their children. "The earlier we can effectively detect and treat maternal depression, the better our chances of improving outcomes." Dr Moss suggested screening for depression could start when couples begin planning a pregnancy, and continue through the perinatal period and early childhood.Also Read: Seeking help sooner is better for mums and kids, suggests maternal health study

10:44 AM The children of mothers with long-term depression have been found to be at higher risk of behavioral problems and poor development suggests a recent study. University of Queensland researchers analyzed depression levels in 892 mothers and the development and behavior of 978 children, using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, in the study published in the Journal of Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology.They compared maternal depression before, during, and after pregnancy, and found duration was more influential than timing. Researcher Dr. Katrina Moss said the study found one in five women experienced depression once, while 11 percent experienced a reoccurrence."The longer a mother suffered maternal depression, the worse the outcomes for the child," Dr. Moss said. "Mothers may worry that if they've been depressed during pregnancy then it's too late to do anything about it, but reducing depressive symptoms at any stage is better for them and their children."The earlier we can effectively detect and treat maternal depression, the better our chances of improving outcomes." Dr. Moss suggested screening for depression could start when couples begin planning a pregnancy, and continue through the perinatal period and early childhood."Maternal depression is a significant challenge for women, families, and communities, and we need to look after women better at key times in their lives," she said. Dr Moss said women experiencing depression should visit their GP and use supportive parent resources from organizations such as PANDA or the Gidget Foundation.

1:19 PM The novel Coronavirus (nCoV) or COVID 19 is spread through nasal discharge during human sneezes. The fetus in the womb is not affected by this disease as it is confined to the respiratory organs of the expecting mother. As the fetus gets its food and oxygen through the blood of the mother, there is hardly any chance of transmitting the infection. However, a newborn baby may get infected if it is not immediately separated from the mother. This is because the baby will have higher chances of infection through contact with the hands and other external things where the virus is present. Also Read: Coronavirus may not transmit from pregnant moms to babies: Study

4:15 PM Indian film actress Sameera Reddy (39), who was blessed with a daughter on July 12, 2019, has shared her stylish underwater photographs during pregnancy. These pictures were shot in the very advanced stage of pregnancy when she was carrying her second child Nyara in her womb. "Be fearless above and beyond everything," wrote Sameera Reddy. She shared the pictures on her Instagram and also on the hashtag #ImperfectlyPerfect. "#ImperfectlyPerfect began with my 9-month pregnancy underwater series last year. Nyra wanted me to break the barriers in my mind and damn straight I did it," she wrote. The 39-year-old actress is seen posing underwater in sarees and also in bikinis, with the highlight on her baby bump. Devdiscourse is running a global communication campaign to increase happiness in the lives of To Be Mothers.She is also seen performing some underwater Yoga positions as well.Reddy became popular in the Bollywood through her pivotal role in Maine Dil Tujhko Diya in 2002. Her memorable role includes Musafir, (2004) in which she performed opposite to Anil KapoorAditya Pancholi and Koena Mitra"Be fearless above and beyond everything," said Reddy. She married Akshai Varde, an entrepreneur on 21 January 2014. The couple had a son in 2015. Sameera described herself as a "tomboy" and "the ugly duckling in the family". She writes, "I was plump, had glasses and my glam quotient was rather low till I was 19".Sameera is credited to be the first Indian actress to have her own video game, Sameera the Street Fighter. I wanted to celebrate the beauty of the bump in my 9th month. At a time when we feel the most vulnerable, tired, scared, excited, and our biggest and most beautiful. I look forward to sharing it with you guys and I know the positivity will resonate because we all are at different phases of our life with unique sizes and we need to love and accept ourselves at every level.

4:45 PM The study was conducted in the Univesity of Alberta, the USA. In this study, the researchers examined health records of 1,043 mother-infant pairs and found adverse effects of tension in expectant mothers on their children. For the research, the mothers filled out regular questionnaires about their mood during and after their pregnancies.Also Read: Depressive symptoms during pregnancy can lower child's immunity: Study

11:27 AM The study has been published in the journal of Scientific Reports. The USF Health researchers used a powerful genome editing technology called CRISPR (shorthand for "CRISPR-dCas9) to activate all of the chromosome 19 microRNA cluster (known as C19MC), so they could study the gene's function in early pregnancy. In the study, the researchers have made a breakthrough to minimise the chances of pregnancy-related complications such as miscarriages, preeclampsia and foetal growth restriction. They have discovered a process that contributes to placental implantation during early pregnancy as well as cancer progression and spread. Also Read: Researchers find a process to minimise pregnancy-related complications

1:57 PM Being pregnant is not a disease but just a phase which a woman goes through said the legislator Namita Mundada who represents Beed MLA segment in Maharashtra Legislative Assembly. "I also face issues like other pregnant woman but I follow my doctor's advice and take care of myself along with my work," she said adding the ongoing budget session was very important for her. Also Read: Namita Mundada, 8-month pregnant MLA from Beed attends Maha Assembly session

Gigi Hadid claps back at claim she's 'disguising' her baby bump

Gigi Hadid claps back at claim she's 'disguising' her baby bump

American supermodel Gigi Hadid recently called out a publication for posting an article that suggested she's been "disguising" her growing baby bump with her fashion choices. According to E!News, earlier this week, British Vogue published a story about Hadid's pregnancy. The outlet explained that during an Instagram Live, the 25-year-old model answered a fan's question about not having "a tummy."

Hadid answered, "This angle and the really baggy jumpsuit make for an optical illusion. From the side, it's a different story!" However, Hadid cleared the air and clapped back at the publication for its misleading headline.

"Disguise....," she began her caption on Twitter, which was directly in response to British Vogue's post on the social media platform. "I said in a baggy jumpsuit the front and side views are visually different stories - not that that was intentional or I was trying to hide anything. Will be proud and happy to share 'insight' when I feel like it, thanks." "For now I am proudly experiencing and sharing this time with my family and loved ones," she added.

While rumors are doing the rounds that Hadid would be having a girl and expecting her first child with boyfriend Zayn Malik, she has kept details of her little one to herself. She did confirm the news of the baby in April during a virtual appearance on late-night TV show host Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show'.

"Obviously, we wished we could have announced it on our own terms but we're very excited and happy and grateful for everyone's well wishes and support," she told the late-night host at the time. "Especially during this time... it's a nice silver lining to be able to be home and be together and really experience it day by day," added the supermodel. (ANI)

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Thousands rally at Black Lives Matter protests in Australia

Thousands rally at Black Lives Matter protests in Australia

Several thousand people rallied in Black Lives Matter protests across Australia over the weekend to call for racial equality and highlight deaths of Indigenous people while in police custody. About 500 people protested Sunday in Newcastle, north of Sydney, after the New South Wales state Supreme Court approved the rally following an attempt by police to have it banned.

A rally in Sydney on Sunday began with a ceremony at which people mourned the Indigenous Australians who have died in police custody. There have been more than 400 Indigenous deaths in custody since a royal commission into the issue ended in 1991. No convictions have been recorded in any of the deaths.

“We went through the lawful process, we sat through that process of the coronial inquiry, we listened to that process and we received no justice from that process," Sydney rally organiser Paul Silva told SBS Television. “This is our process to demand justice." On Saturday, Australians took part in Black Lives Matter rallies in the cities of Brisbane, Darwin, Perth and Adelaide. Many of the protesters work masks and attempted to maintain social distancing due to coronavirus concerns. Australia's Indigenous people are the most disadvantaged ethnic minority in the country. They have higher-than-average rates of infant mortality and poor health, as well as shorter life expectancy and lower levels of education and employment than other Australians.

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Gestational Hypertension: Women with high blood pressure during pregnancy may develop heart diseases later

Gestational Hypertension: Women with high blood pressure during pregnancy may develop heart diseases later

According to an international team of researchers, women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease and heart failure in later life. Between 1-6 percent of all pregnancies in Western countries are affected by high blood pressure, which usually returns to normal after giving birth.

This condition is known as gestational hypertension or pregnancy-induced hypertension. Clinicians increasingly recognize that women who have had gestational hypertension are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease in later life. However, studies of different kinds of cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease and heart failure, have found mixed results.

To examine these links further, an international team of researchers conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 21 studies involving a total of 3.6 million women, 128,000 of who previously had gestational hypertension. This type of study is a way of combining data from all existing relevant studies, allowing researchers to compare and consolidate results from often-contradictory studies to reach more robust conclusions.

The results are published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers found that women who experienced high blood pressure during their first pregnancy were at a 45 percent higher risk of overall cardiovascular disease and 46 percent higher risk of coronary heart disease compared to women who did not have high blood pressure in pregnancy.

Women with one or more pregnancies affected by high blood pressure were at 81 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease, 83 percent higher risk of coronary heart disease, and 77 percent higher risk of heart failure. "When we looked at all the available research, the answer was clear: women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy even when it doesn't develop into pre-eclampsia - are more likely to develop several different kinds of cardiovascular disease," said senior author Dr. Clare Oliver-Williams from the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge.

The study adds to growing evidence of the relationship between pregnancy and subsequent risk of cardiovascular events. Recurrent miscarriages, preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and pre-eclampsia have all previously been linked with a greater risk of heart disease. The researchers say it is not entirely clear why gestational hypertension is associated with heart disease in later life. However, they suggest it may be that high blood pressure in pregnancy causes lasting damage that contributes to cardiovascular disease.

Alternatively, women who develop gestational hypertension may have a pre-existing susceptibility to cardiovascular disease that is revealed due to the large demands that pregnancy places upon women's bodies. Dr. Oliver-Williams said: "It is important that women know that it is not their fault that they developed high blood pressure in pregnancy and developing heart disease is not a foregone conclusion. Women who have experienced gestational hypertension may have been dealt a tough hand, but it is how they play those cards that matters the most."

"Small positive changes can really help. They can be as simple as eating more fruit and vegetables, small bouts of regular exercise, and finding time to unwind if that is possible with kids around," Dr. Williams added. 

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Duration of depression in expectant mothers more influential than timing: Study

Duration of depression in expectant mothers more influential than timing: Study

"Mothers may worry that if they've been depressed during pregnancy then it's too late to do anything about it, but reducing depressive symptoms at any stage is better for them and their children. "The earlier we can effectively detect and treat maternal depression, the better our chances of improving outcomes." Dr Moss suggested screening for depression could start when couples begin planning a pregnancy, and continue through the perinatal period and early childhood.

Also Read: Seeking help sooner is better for mums and kids, suggests maternal health study

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Longer maternal depression, the worse the outcomes for the child: Study

Longer maternal depression, the worse the outcomes for the child: Study

The children of mothers with long-term depression have been found to be at higher risk of behavioral problems and poor development suggests a recent study. University of Queensland researchers analyzed depression levels in 892 mothers and the development and behavior of 978 children, using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, in the study published in the Journal of Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology.

They compared maternal depression before, during, and after pregnancy, and found duration was more influential than timing. Researcher Dr. Katrina Moss said the study found one in five women experienced depression once, while 11 percent experienced a reoccurrence.

"The longer a mother suffered maternal depression, the worse the outcomes for the child," Dr. Moss said. "Mothers may worry that if they've been depressed during pregnancy then it's too late to do anything about it, but reducing depressive symptoms at any stage is better for them and their children.

"The earlier we can effectively detect and treat maternal depression, the better our chances of improving outcomes." Dr. Moss suggested screening for depression could start when couples begin planning a pregnancy, and continue through the perinatal period and early childhood.

"Maternal depression is a significant challenge for women, families, and communities, and we need to look after women better at key times in their lives," she said. Dr Moss said women experiencing depression should visit their GP and use supportive parent resources from organizations such as PANDA or the Gidget Foundation.

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Coronavirus may not transmit from pregnant moms to babies: Study

Coronavirus may not transmit from pregnant moms to babies: Study

The novel Coronavirus (nCoV) or COVID 19 is spread through nasal discharge during human sneezes. The fetus in the womb is not affected by this disease as it is confined to the respiratory organs of the expecting mother. As the fetus gets its food and oxygen through the blood of the mother, there is hardly any chance of transmitting the infection. 

However, a newborn baby may get infected if it is not immediately separated from the mother. This is because the baby will have higher chances of infection through contact with the hands and other external things where the virus is present. 

Also Read: Coronavirus may not transmit from pregnant moms to babies: Study

 

READ MORE ON : COVID 19Coronavirus
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Indian film actress Sameera Reddy epitomizes Mother, Not Patient! in her stylish pregnancy photos

Indian film actress Sameera Reddy epitomizes Mother, Not Patient! in her stylish pregnancy photos

Indian film actress Sameera Reddy (39), who was blessed with a daughter on July 12, 2019, has shared her stylish underwater photographs during pregnancy. These pictures were shot in the very advanced stage of pregnancy when she was carrying her second child Nyara in her womb. 

"Be fearless above and beyond everything," wrote Sameera Reddy. She shared the pictures on her Instagram and also on the hashtag #ImperfectlyPerfect. "#ImperfectlyPerfect began with my 9-month pregnancy underwater series last year. Nyra wanted me to break the barriers in my mind and damn straight I did it," she wrote. The 39-year-old actress is seen posing underwater in sarees and also in bikinis, with the highlight on her baby bump. Devdiscourse is running a global communication campaign to increase happiness in the lives of To Be Mothers.

She is also seen performing some underwater Yoga positions as well.

Reddy became popular in the Bollywood through her pivotal role in Maine Dil Tujhko Diya in 2002. Her memorable role includes Musafir, (2004) in which she performed opposite to  Anil KapoorAditya Pancholi and Koena Mitra

"Be fearless above and beyond everything," said Reddy. She married Akshai Varde, an entrepreneur on 21 January 2014. The couple had a son in 2015. 

Sameera described herself as a "tomboy" and "the ugly duckling in the family". She writes, "I was plump, had glasses and my glam quotient was rather low till I was 19".

Sameera is credited to be the first Indian actress to have her own video game, Sameera the Street Fighter. 

I wanted to celebrate the beauty of the bump in my 9th month. At a time when we feel the most vulnerable, tired, scared, excited, and our biggest and most beautiful. I look forward to sharing it with you guys and I know the positivity will resonate because we all are at different phases of our life with unique sizes and we need to love and accept ourselves at every level. 

  • 0 Like
  • 0 Dislike
  • 0 Comment

No Comments

Depression in expectant mothers lowers child's immunity: Study

Depression in expectant mothers lowers child's immunity: Study

The study was conducted in the Univesity of  Alberta, the USA. In this study, the researchers examined health records of 1,043 mother-infant pairs and found adverse effects of tension in expectant mothers on their children. For the research, the mothers filled out regular questionnaires about their mood during and after their pregnancies.

Also Read: Depressive symptoms during pregnancy can lower child's immunity: Study

  • 0 Like
  • 0 Dislike
  • 0 Comment

No Comments

Researchers find a process to minimize pregnancy-related complications

Researchers find a process to minimize pregnancy-related complications

The study has been published in the journal of Scientific Reports. The USF Health researchers used a powerful genome editing technology called CRISPR (shorthand for "CRISPR-dCas9) to activate all of the chromosome 19 microRNA cluster (known as C19MC), so they could study the gene's function in early pregnancy. In the study, the researchers have made a breakthrough to minimise the chances of pregnancy-related complications such as miscarriages, preeclampsia and foetal growth restriction. They have discovered a process that contributes to placental implantation during early pregnancy as well as cancer progression and spread. 

Also Read: Researchers find a process to minimise pregnancy-related complications

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  • 0 Comment

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Namita Mundada, 8-month pregnant MLA from Beed attends Maha Assembly session

Namita Mundada, 8-month pregnant MLA from Beed attends Maha Assembly session

Being pregnant is not a disease but just a phase which a woman goes through said the legislator Namita Mundada who represents Beed MLA segment in Maharashtra Legislative Assembly. "I also face issues like other pregnant woman but I follow my doctor's advice and take care of myself along with my work," she said adding the ongoing budget session was very important for her. 

Also Read: Namita Mundada, 8-month pregnant MLA from Beed attends Maha Assembly session

 

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