Ericsson-backed self-driving bus project tests new safety features

The trial, which was conducted using the self-driving 5G Ride electric minibus near Ericsson's company headquarters in Kista, Sweden, explored how 5G and remote monitoring of vehicles via control towers could help to facilitate the introduction of self-driving electric buses in urban environments in a safe way.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Stockholm | Updated: 30-10-2021 10:21 IST | Created: 30-10-2021 10:21 IST
Ericsson-backed self-driving bus project tests new safety features
Image Credit: Ericsson
  • Country:
  • Sweden

5G Ride, a 5G-enabled self-driving bus project backed by Ericsson, has successfully trialled new safety features - remote digital monitoring and onboard digital safety services. With this trial, the project has moved closer to full operations.

The trial, which was conducted using the self-driving 5G Ride electric minibus near Ericsson's company headquarters in Kista, Sweden, explored how 5G and remote monitoring of vehicles via control towers could help to facilitate the introduction of self-driving electric buses in urban environments in a safe way.

The project, a collaboration between Ericsson, Urban ICT Arena, Intel, Keolis, T-Engineering, and Telia, debuted in September 2020. It aims to support efficient and sustainable public transport where operators in the control tower can manage fleets of autonomous, electric vehicles (EVs) to improve traffic planning and route optimization, making transport cost-effective and accessible while reducing its environmental footprint.

For the latest trial, the project partners provided:

  • Ericsson - technical solution for the 5G-connected control tower
  • Telia - connectivity in collaboration with Ericsson
  • Intel - analytics in the bus for increased passenger safety
  • T-Engineering - the vehicle and self-driving technology

T-Engineering is working closely with Ericsson to integrate the minibus with the control tower.

The high-speed data transfer, low latency and reliability provided by a high-performance 5G network enables real-time communication between both the self-driving bus and the central control tower. For example, a bus operator in the control tower can remotely command and even control the vehicle if necessary.

"The 5G network's unique technical features, including extremely high data speeds combined with low latency, means that the connected buses can respond in real-time to commands from the centralized control tower. This delivers a critical and powerful foundation for the safe and secure remote-control of vehicles and is an important step to manage buses and public transport in a smart and sustainable way," said Marcus Gardman Lead Design Technologist, Ericsson.

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