Science News Roundup: Uganda says its debut satellite launched into orbit; Elon Musk expects Neuralink's brain chip to begin human trials in 6 months and more

The company is developing brain chip interfaces that it says could help disabled patients to move and communicate again, with Musk adding on Wednesday it will also target restoring vision. 'Amazing' goose-necked dinosaur was built like a diving bird The expansive dinosaur group that included big predators such as T.


Devdiscourse News Desk | Updated: 03-12-2022 18:38 IST | Created: 03-12-2022 18:33 IST
Science News Roundup: Uganda says its debut satellite launched into orbit; Elon Musk expects Neuralink's brain chip to begin human trials in 6 months and more
Elon Musk (Image source: Twitter) Image Credit: ANI

Following is a summary of current science news briefs.

Uganda says its debut satellite launched into orbit

Uganda's first satellite has been successfully launched into orbit from the International Space Station (ISS) and the East African nation's ground controllers were in contact with the device, the government said on Friday. The PearlAfricaSat-1 spacecraft was rocketed to the ISS by NASA on Nov. 7, alongside Zimbabwe's ZimSat-1, with officials saying it will help Uganda monitor weather and disasters, map its mineral wealth and generate other crucial data.

Elon Musk expects Neuralink's brain chip to begin human trials in 6 months

Elon Musk said on Wednesday he expects a wireless brain chip developed by his company Neuralink to begin human clinical trials in six months, after the company missed earlier timelines set by him. The company is developing brain chip interfaces that it says could help disabled patients to move and communicate again, with Musk adding on Wednesday it will also target restoring vision.

'Amazing' goose-necked dinosaur was built like a diving bird

The expansive dinosaur group that included big predators such as T. rex also was populated by a number of oddballs, weirdos and outcasts. A newly described dinosaur from Mongolia - the size of a goose and looking a bit like one, too - fits that description. The dinosaur, called Natovenator polydontus, lived about 72 million years ago during the Cretaceous Period and was built like a diving bird with a streamlined body while possessing a goose-like elongated neck and a long flattened snout with a mouth bearing more than 100 small teeth, scientists said on Thursday. It almost surely was covered in feathers, they added.

(With inputs from agencies.)

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