Pero weaves nostalgia and childhood in its LFW collection

When you come back, you return as a new person and the freshness shows in every new thing one tried to do." Preparing a collection amid the coronavirus pandemic could be a daunting task, but the designer said when the team returned to work after lockdown, they came back with a lot of enthusiasm hoping things might go back to normal soon. 'Locked in Love' was a labour of love and passion of 500 craftspeople, who belonged to various regions like Chanderi in Madhya Pradesh, West Bengal to the southern states in India.


PTI | New Delhi | Updated: 22-10-2020 20:52 IST | Created: 22-10-2020 20:31 IST
Pero weaves nostalgia and childhood in its LFW collection
Representative image Image Credit: ANI
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Designer Aneeth Arora says the latest clothing line from her label Pero is an effort to bring alive one's 'inner child' by touching upon the themes of childhood and nostalgia. 'Locked in Love', the spring-summer collection, is a subtle take on the Japanese street style of Harajuku fashion, which is for a wearer who loves to have fun with clothing and play dress up.

"We have incorporated everything associated with childhood -- be it frills, ribbons, bows, flounces, and laces, which as a kid, I would have also worn. In terms of embroidery, we have used which as kids we have seen our grandmothers or mothers do for us," Arora told PTI in an interview. The collection was presented on Thursday, the second day of the first-ever season-fluid and virtual edition of Lakme Fashion Week (LFW) in Mumbai. For this season's surface ornamentation, the Delhi-based designer said, the team has explored old school embroidery techniques like bullion and French knots.

The colour palette for the season is predominantly pastels, with hand painted floral surfaces, with printed and embroidered wreaths and trellises. The showcase achieved a complete look with footwear from Grounds, a Japanese shoe label.

In the past, many of Arora's collections have drawn inspiration from her travels across different countries such as Guatemala, Mexico, Peru and China, and the designer said there's a constant learning when one experiences the world on the move. "It's not only clothing or textile that inspires a fashion designer. Anything, a good plate of food you eat, good music you listen to, a good company when you travel with - all these things also add to the experience and inspiration for a designer. "It's very essential for creative people to keep moving out and experiencing the world. When you come back, you return as a new person and the freshness shows in every new thing one tried to do." Preparing a collection amid the coronavirus pandemic could be a daunting task, but the designer said when the team returned to work after lockdown, they came back with a lot of enthusiasm hoping things might go back to normal soon.

'Locked in Love' was a labour of love and passion of 500 craftspeople, who belonged to various regions like Chanderi in Madhya Pradesh, West Bengal to the southern states in India. Arora said as a lot of people were away in their villages in the wake of the migrant crisis, it was a challenging feat at first.

"We worked with lesser number of people and although we have our full strength now. Things got a little delayed and rushed. Luckily, we had sent our craftspeople the sampling they had to do before the lockdown. "As we weave our fabrics a lot more in advance than even a year, they were already working on it. Fortunately they had work during the lockdown. They also work from home anyway. In terms of safety measures, we were doing whatever we could in Delhi." Asked how she struck a balance between honouring different techniques from different cultures and creating something unique and memorable, the designer said she tries to incorporate traditional textiles to make a global product which resonates with people who have not seen those techniques in their daily lives. Ten years ago when Arora started the brand, she used Jamdani, one of the world's finest and classic Muslin craft, and Bandhni, a technique of dyeing a fabric which is tied tightly with a thread at several points, thus producing a variety of patterns.

"As we kept repeating it season after season in different ways, after a point of time when people at any trade show in Paris, Milan or US, would see that fabric, they would call it by the technique name. That is when you realise that people are getting to know the techniques used in India through what you are doing," she said. "We also mix a lot of European lace and other things that are a culture of outside India. Like folk costumes of Spain, so when people see those little things, they look at them as a sum total, not just an ethnic embroidery from India," she added.

The LFW concludes Sunday.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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