Left Menu
Development News Edition

LGBT+ marches from London to New York call for end to racism

By Matthew Lavietes and Hugo Greenhalgh NEW YORK/LONDON, June 27 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As thousands of people marched in support of Pride and racial justice globally this weekend, many demonstrators called for an end to often-overlooked racism within the LGBT+ community. Pride events to celebrate LGBT+ rights are held globally throughout June - although most were cancelled or moved online this year due to the coronavirus pandemic - but the emergence of protests over racial injustice spurred a series of live events.

Reuters | Updated: 28-06-2020 14:24 IST | Created: 28-06-2020 01:02 IST
LGBT+ marches from London to New York call for end to racism
"It's still definitely pretty prevalent," said Kwamina Theo Amihyia, joining a Black Trans Lives Matter march in London. Image Credit: Flickr

By Matthew Lavietes and Hugo Greenhalgh NEW YORK/LONDON, June 27 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As thousands of people marched in support of Pride and racial justice globally this weekend, many demonstrators called for an end to often-overlooked racism within the LGBT+ community.

Pride events to celebrate LGBT+ rights are held globally throughout June - although most were cancelled or moved online this year due to the coronavirus pandemic - but the emergence of protests over racial injustice spurred a series of live events. While studies show LGBT+ people of colour are more prone to violence and poverty, a 2018 Stonewall/YouGov survey also found more than half of Black, Asian and other minority LGBT+ Britons experienced discrimination from members of their own community.

"It's still definitely pretty prevalent," said Kwamina Theo Amihyia, joining a Black Trans Lives Matter march in London. "As far as we've come, a lot of the strides made have been for white members of the (LGBT+) community and we're still seen almost as second-class citizens."

Racial inequalities globally have come under the microscope following the death of George Floyd, 46, in police custody in the United States on May 25. Many LGBT+ groups released statements in support of protests after Floyd's death, pointing out the radical origins of the LGBT+ rights movement at the Stonewall Inn in New York 51 years ago that emerged to fight police brutality.

"As a queer person myself, I face racism from the queer community – and it's time we stamped it out," Patrick King told the Thomson Reuters Foundation as he marched along with one of central London's main thoroughfares with car horns blaring. London's Black Trans Lives Matter march was one of several events planned this weekend to support Black Lives Matter. DATING APPS CHANGED

With the debate over systemic racism also hitting LGBT+ businesses this month, Gay dating apps Grindr and Scruff removed ethnicity filters in response to protests for racial justice. College student Donald Arrington, 19, who was due to take part in an informal Pride march in Los Angeles on Sunday, said he had been rejected on LGBT+ dating apps because he was Black.

"It's always, 'Hey sorry, you're good looking, but, unfortunately, I don't date Black guys'," said Arrington, On Sunday, thousands of people are expected to attend New York's Queer Liberation March, an event moved online due to the coronavirus but then back to the streets after the protests against police brutality and racism after Floyd's death.

"There needs to be the element of people in the streets and popular revolt and outrage," said Natalie James, co-founder of the Reclaim Pride Coalition, which is hosting the march. "There's not really a substitute for it." But Ed Brockenbrough, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, said the move by Pride organisations to adopt Black Lives Matter issues did not go far enough to address racism in the LGBT+ community.

"Activism in Black and brown queer communities has been happening for a long time without full buy-in from white gatekeepers of queer resources," said Brockenbrough, whose research focuses on the challenges of LGBT+ people of colour. For Ted Brown, a veteran of Britain's Gay Liberation Front (GLF) marching in London on Saturday, not enough has changed since he was out on the "scene" in the 1970s.

"(Racism) remains an issue within the LGBT+ community," Brown told the Thomson Reuters Foundation as banners and placards were unfurled and raised around him. "If you look around here, for example, I'm one of the few Black people here ... The LGBT+ community needs to look at themselves and find out how they can become more diverse."


TRENDING

OPINION / BLOG / INTERVIEW

How UK’s 'best prepared' healthcare system failed to gauge COVID-19

The UK is proud of their public health system and its unlike any other country as around 90 percent of British public supports the founding principles of National Health Service. But without accurate data being available to stakeholders in ...

Poor on IHR capacity progress in 2019, WHO says Cambodia tops COVID-19 response

Despite being in proximity to Hubei, the original epicenter of COVID-19 pandemic, Cambodia has reported just 226 confirmed cases and zero deaths. After seeing the data, WHO appreciated Cambodias healthcare information system but experts dou...

Loopholes in Healthcare Information System may have failed Singapore COVID-19 model

In the initial days of the COVID-19 outbreak, Singapore was in the limelight for its effective healthcare system and pandemic response plan. However, Singapore has now joined the list of the worst-hit nations and the situation is even worse...

Australia's COVID-19 response: Digital infrastructure of help but implementation remains a challenge

Australias ongoing plans to upgrade its health information system helped by the Digital Health Strategy seem even more practical due to the pandemic. But as evident during the pandemic, administrative lapses and the complex matrix of power ...

Videos

Latest News

FACTBOX-Latest on the worldwide spread of the coronavirus

Australias second-most populous state Victoria said military personnel will be deployed to enforce isolation orders, while the U.S. governments top infectious disease expert said states with high case counts should reconsider imposing restr...

Indian-Americans to celebrate Ram Temple foundation laying ceremony

Temples across the US have announced special events to celebrate the foundation laying ceremony of the historic Ram Temple in Ayodhya, with a tableau truck displaying digital images of the Ram Temple going around the US Capitol Hill on Tues...

No NBA draft yet as forward Yves Pons returns to Tennessee

Forward Yves Pons has informed Tennessee he is returning for his senior season with the Volunteers rather than try his luck with the NBA draft. Im back, Pons announced Monday on Twitter.Pons was the Southeastern Conference defensive player ...

'Emotional roller coaster': Preity Zinta re-watches 'Dil Bechara', thanks director for doing justice to film

Almost two months after the demise of late Bollywood actor Sushant Singh Rajput, actor Preity Zinta on Tuesday watched his last film Dil Bechara for the second time and said it was an emotional roller coaster. The Kal Ho Na Ho actor shared ...

Give Feedback