US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. Justice Dept says it will no longer seize reporters' records in leak investigations; U.S. conservatives stake claim to climate activism with Miami rally and more

The NRA made the move after a federal judge on May 11 threw out the gun rights group's January bankruptcy case, which he called an improper effort to avoid James' regulatory oversight and gain an "unfair litigation advantage." U.S. Justice Dept says it will no longer seize reporters' records in leak investigations The Department of Justice said on Saturday that it would no longer seek source information from reporters in leak investigations after recent revelations that former President Donald Trump's administration had secretly obtained phone and email records from a number of journalists.


Reuters | Updated: 06-06-2021 18:37 IST | Created: 06-06-2021 18:31 IST
US Domestic News Roundup: U.S. Justice Dept says it will no longer seize reporters' records in leak investigations; U.S. conservatives stake claim to climate activism with Miami rally and more
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Following is a summary of current US domestic news briefs.

U.S. administers 300.3 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines - CDC

The United States has administered 300,268,730 doses of COVID-19 vaccines in the country and distributed 371,520,975 doses as of Saturday morning, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Those figures are up from the 299,120,522 vaccine doses the CDC said had gone into arms by June 4 out of 369,159,075 doses delivered.

NRA to defend against NY attorney general in Manhattan, drops own lawsuit

The National Rifle Association said on Friday it will defend against New York Attorney General Letitia James' attempt to shut it down in a state court in Manhattan, and has withdrawn its own lawsuit seeking to block her efforts. The NRA made the move after a federal judge on May 11 threw out the gun rights group's January bankruptcy case, which he called an improper effort to avoid James' regulatory oversight and gain an "unfair litigation advantage."

U.S. Justice Dept says it will no longer seize reporters' records in leak investigations

The Department of Justice said on Saturday that it would no longer seek source information from reporters in leak investigations after recent revelations that former President Donald Trump's administration had secretly obtained phone and email records from a number of journalists. CNN and the Washington Post have said the Trump administration had secretly tried to obtain the phone records of some of their reporters over work they did in 2017.

U.S. conservatives stake claim to climate activism with Miami rally

For Benji Backer, being conservative means believing in limited government, market-based solutions -- and the scientists who say carbon emissions must be cut to avoid the worst of climate change. Backer's nonprofit, the American Conservation Coalition, held what it billed as the country's first conservative climate rally in Miami, part of an effort by the 23-year-old activist to convince fellow right-leaning Americans they don't have to be liberals to support action on the issue.

In rare public outing, Trump denounces Fauci, China; dangles 2024 prospects

Former President Donald Trump on Saturday sharply attacked U.S. infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, demanded reparations from China and denounced an investigation into his finances in a speech in North Carolina. Speaking in Greenville, North Carolina, at the state's Republican Party convention, Trump joined a chorus of Republican politicians who are criticizing Fauci for asking Americans to wear masks to guard against the virus and who at times has been skeptical of a theory that the virus escaped from a laboratory in Wuhan, China.

U.S. Justice Dept got gag order on NY Times execs in fight over email logs - NYT

The U.S. Justice Department under presidents Donald Trump and Joe Biden waged "a secret legal battle to obtain the email logs of four New York Times reporters," including a gag order on executives, the newspaper reported on Friday. The legal battle to gain access to the email logs of four of the journalists started in the last weeks of Trump's presidency and sought to reveal reporters' sources, the Times said https://nyti.ms/3uRBH9V.

U.S. federal judge overturns California's ban on assault weapons

A U.S. federal judge overturned California's 32-year-old ban on assault weapons on Friday, describing it as a "failed experiment" and prompting scathing criticism from the state's governor and attorney general. California has prohibited the sale of assault weapons since 1989. The ban was challenged in a 2019 lawsuit against California's attorney general by plaintiffs including James Miller, a state resident, and the San Diego County Gun Owners, a political action committee.

Ocasio-Cortez endorses progressive Maya Wiley for New York City mayor

Democratic Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Saturday endorsed Maya Wiley for New York City mayor, boosting Wiley's chances to establish herself as the leading progressive in the crowded race. Speaking at an event outside City Hall in Manhattan, progressive firebrand Ocasio-Cortez called on voters to "come together as a movement" to avoid the city's being run "for billionaires and special interests."

U.S. encouraged by progress toward vaccine patent waiver

Progress is being made towards a deal on an intellectual property waiver for COVID-19 vaccines at the World Trade Organization (WTO), U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai said on Saturday. Tai pointed to a revised proposal from the original proponents of the waiver, led by India and South Africa, as well as principles the European Union has come up with to guide how they would like to negotiate the issues.

Pentagon not to allow pride flags to be flown on installations

The Pentagon said on Friday that it would not make an exception to allow U.S. military installations to fly rainbow pride flags in June, keeping a policy set by former President Donald Trump that limited the type of flags that could be flown on bases. Earlier this week, President Joe Biden said that nearly 1,500 of his federal agency appointees identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer, in a proclamation marking the start of Pride Month celebrating the LGBTQ community.

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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