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Madagascar presidential election faced minor irregularities: EU observer

Hery Rajaonarimampianina, seeking a second term and one of the three front-runners, complained on Thursday about the use of an invalid voter register, delays in the opening of the polls in some places, intimidation and ballot-stuffing.


Devdiscourse News Desk Last Updated at 09-11-2018 16:42:41 IST Madagascar
Madagascar presidential election faced minor irregularities: EU observer
  • Voters are eager to get a winner who will tackle the impoverished Indian Ocean island's many problems including unemployment and corruption. (Image Credit: Reuters)

The head of the European Union's observer mission to Madagascar's presidential election said on Friday that any irregularities found so far were minor and unlikely to affect the results.

Hery Rajaonarimampianina, seeking a second term and one of the three front-runners, complained on Thursday about the use of an invalid voter register, delays in the opening of the polls in some places, intimidation and ballot-stuffing.

But the EU's chief observer Cristian Preda said they had not detected anything that would alter the result or call Wednesday's vote into question.

"We are in a good atmosphere. The disputes are part of the democratic game... it's normal, it's human. Disputes must be handled by the law enforcement bodies," Preda said.

He, however, noted that the lack of a cap on campaign spending by the candidates had put some at a disadvantage, without providing any names.

In an irony in one of Africa's poorest countries, the result of the first round of voting could hinge in part on which of the three front-runners -- all wealthy men -- spent the most money campaigning for the contest.

"In 2013, the European Union recommended capping candidate expenses and in future reports, there will still be this recommendation," Preda said.

Voters are eager to get a winner who will tackle the impoverished Indian Ocean island's many problems including unemployment and corruption.

The poll pits Rajaonarimampianina against former president Andry Rajoelina, who has claimed victory already, and another former leader Marc Ravalomanana. The contest has drawn a total of 36 candidates.

Because of the unusually high number of contestants, few expect an outright winner and the poll is widely expected to go into a second round. This would involve only the two top candidates and would be held on Dec. 19.

Observers and Malagasy are hoping for the second peaceful election since the upheaval of 2009 when Ravalomanana was forced out of office by protests led by Rajoelina in what international organisations such as the African Union said were a coup.

(With inputs from agencies.)


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