International Development News
Development News Edition
Give Feedback
Cricket World Cup 2019

UPDATE 1-U.S. Supreme Court rebuffs bid to expand legal protections for gun silencers


Reuters
Updated: 10-06-2019 19:27 IST
UPDATE 1-U.S. Supreme Court rebuffs bid to expand legal protections for gun silencers

Image Credit: Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday turned away a bid to widen legal protections for gun silencers in a case involving two Kansas men convicted for failing to register the devices as required by federal law, as the justices again sidestepped a chance to rule on the scope of the right to bear arms. The justices declined to hear appeals by the two men, Shane Cox and Jeremy Kettler, and left in place their convictions in cases brought by federal prosecutors. The men had asked the court to decide whether silencers - muzzle attachments that suppress the sound of a gunshot - are covered by the U.S. Constitution's Second Amendment, which protects the right to keep and bear arms.

The court's action came in the aftermath of a May 31 mass shooting in the Virginia coastal city of Virginia Beach in which a gunman who killed 12 people used weapons including a handgun equipped with a silencer. President Donald Trump, a Republican with a close relationship to the National Rifle Association pro-gun lobby, said in an interview aired on June 5 that he does not like silencers and would be open to considering the devices. His administration this year imposed a ban on "bump stock" attachments that enable semi-automatic weapons to be fired rapidly, with the Supreme Court in March permitting the policy to take effect.

Kettler and Cox were prosecuted together in 2014 after Kettler purchased a silencer from Cox's military surplus store in Chanute, Kansas. Both were prosecuted under a federal law called the National Firearms Act, which requires registration of certain firearms, with silencers included in a list of covered items along with grenades, machine guns and bombs. Cox was convicted of possessing an unregistered silencer as well as an unregistered short-barreled rifle and transferring unregistered silencers. Kettler was convicted of possessing an unregistered silencer.

The Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld both men's convictions in a November 2018 ruling, prompting them to appeal to the Supreme Court. (Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

(This story has not been edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

COUNTRY : United States

POST A COMMENT